In the Journals

Large rotator cuff tears had high rate of long head of the biceps tendon pathology

Long head of the biceps tendon pathology was more likely to occur among large and massive rotator cuff tears and tears that involved the subscapularis, according to results published in Arthroscopy.

At an average follow-up of 2.2 years, researchers recorded shoulder range of movement and the Constant score among 141 shoulders that had undergone arthroscopic repair for treatment of full-thickness rotator cuff tears between January 2012 and January 2014. Researchers examined the long head of the biceps tendon during arthroscopy and performed tenotomy in all patients with a pathologic long head of the biceps tendon.

Results showed the overall rate of long head of the biceps tendon pathology was 36.1%, with a statistically significantly greater incidence of long head of the biceps tendon pathology found among tears that involved the subscapularis. Researchers found a statistically significant increase in long head of the biceps tendon pathology with an increase in the size of rotator cuff tear, but found no statistical significance between the duration of the rotator cuff tear and the incidence of long head of the biceps tendon pathology.

Investigators found 89 patients and 52 patients had traumatic and atraumatic tears, respectively. However, results showed no statistically significant difference in the incidence of long head of the biceps tendon pathology between the traumatic and atraumatic groups. Researchers noted an average Constant score of 82 for patients who had undergone long head of the biceps tendon tenotomy and a score of 84 for patients with normal tendons. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Long head of the biceps tendon pathology was more likely to occur among large and massive rotator cuff tears and tears that involved the subscapularis, according to results published in Arthroscopy.

At an average follow-up of 2.2 years, researchers recorded shoulder range of movement and the Constant score among 141 shoulders that had undergone arthroscopic repair for treatment of full-thickness rotator cuff tears between January 2012 and January 2014. Researchers examined the long head of the biceps tendon during arthroscopy and performed tenotomy in all patients with a pathologic long head of the biceps tendon.

Results showed the overall rate of long head of the biceps tendon pathology was 36.1%, with a statistically significantly greater incidence of long head of the biceps tendon pathology found among tears that involved the subscapularis. Researchers found a statistically significant increase in long head of the biceps tendon pathology with an increase in the size of rotator cuff tear, but found no statistical significance between the duration of the rotator cuff tear and the incidence of long head of the biceps tendon pathology.

Investigators found 89 patients and 52 patients had traumatic and atraumatic tears, respectively. However, results showed no statistically significant difference in the incidence of long head of the biceps tendon pathology between the traumatic and atraumatic groups. Researchers noted an average Constant score of 82 for patients who had undergone long head of the biceps tendon tenotomy and a score of 84 for patients with normal tendons. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.