In the JournalsPerspective

Higher rate of return to sports seen with reverse TSA vs hemiarthroplasty

Patients who underwent reverse total shoulder arthroplasty had higher return-to-sports rates with fewer postoperative complaints compared with patients who underwent hemiarthroplasty, according to results.

Researchers identified 102 patients who underwent reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and 71 patients who underwent hemiarthroplasty with a minimum 1-year follow-up.

Joseph N. Liu

 

Compared with hemiarthroplasty, results showed patients who underwent reverse TSA had improved VAS scores, returned to sports at a significantly higher rate (85.9% vs. 66.7%) and were more likely to be satisfied with their ability to play sports. Postoperative complaints were more likely among hemiarthroplasty patients vs. reverse TSA patients, researchers noted. Overall, no sports-related complications occurred, according to results. Researchers found a higher likelihood of return to sports was predicted by female sex, age younger than 70 years, surgery on the dominant extremity and a preoperative diagnosis of arthritis with rotator cuff dysfunction for patients who underwent reverse TSA compared with hemiarthroplasty. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: Liu reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Patients who underwent reverse total shoulder arthroplasty had higher return-to-sports rates with fewer postoperative complaints compared with patients who underwent hemiarthroplasty, according to results.

Researchers identified 102 patients who underwent reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and 71 patients who underwent hemiarthroplasty with a minimum 1-year follow-up.

Joseph N. Liu

 

Compared with hemiarthroplasty, results showed patients who underwent reverse TSA had improved VAS scores, returned to sports at a significantly higher rate (85.9% vs. 66.7%) and were more likely to be satisfied with their ability to play sports. Postoperative complaints were more likely among hemiarthroplasty patients vs. reverse TSA patients, researchers noted. Overall, no sports-related complications occurred, according to results. Researchers found a higher likelihood of return to sports was predicted by female sex, age younger than 70 years, surgery on the dominant extremity and a preoperative diagnosis of arthritis with rotator cuff dysfunction for patients who underwent reverse TSA compared with hemiarthroplasty. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: Liu reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

    Perspective

    Return to sport is a concern for many undergoing shoulder arthroplasty. In the current study, patients who underwent reverse TSA and hemiarthroplasty demonstrated success in return to non-contact sports without sports-related complications and had improvements in VAS and ASES scores. Interestingly, patients undergoing reverse TSA were able to return to sports at higher rates than those undergoing hemiarthroplasty, with fewer postoperative complaints.

    We have made similar observations in our practice when active patients undergo shoulder arthroplasty. Such observations and data from this study support the contention that patients can indeed safely return to sports after prosthetic shoulder arthroplasty. Furthermore, in our opinion, another key factor for a successful return to sport is the preoperative counseling between patient and surgeon to clarify expectations. We always promote a high level of activity in our patients postoperatively, but make them aware of the risk of contact sports and the limited evidence we currently have regarding long-term outcomes or risk factors for failure. This study helps us to counsel our patients better about not only the likelihood of returning to sports, but also the risk of doing so.

    Jonas P. Pogorzelski, MD
    International Research Fellow
    Steadman Philippon Research Institute
    Vail, Colo.

    • Peter J. Millett, MD, MSc
    • Orthopedics Today Editorial Board member Director of Shoulder Surgery The Steadman Clinic Vail, Colo.

    Disclosures: Millett and Pogorzelski report no relevant financial disclosures.