In the Journals

Porous tantalum glenoid component for TSA had high rate of metallic debris formation

Despite a low early failure rate, use of a porous tantalum glenoid component in total shoulder arthroplasty had a high rate of metallic debris formation with longer follow-up, according to results.

Researchers developed a grading system to assess metallic debris formation in 68 patients who underwent total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) with 73 trabecular metal, porous tantalum glenoid components (Zimmer) and used radiographs of the previous generation of porous tantalum glenoid components that failed. Researchers evaluated glenoid components for signs of bone ingrowth and the formation of metallic debris.

Overall, researchers evaluated 90% of the 73 components at a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. Results showed 92.4% of components included had minimal or no glenoid radiolucency and 44% had a prevalence of metallic tantalum debris formation. Researchers found an increase in the incidence of metallic debris formation for each year of follow-up, with a metallic debris incidence of 23% at 2 years; 36% at 3 years; 49% at 4 years; and 52% at 5 years or more of follow-up. The severity of metallic debris formation also increased with follow-up duration, according to results. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Despite a low early failure rate, use of a porous tantalum glenoid component in total shoulder arthroplasty had a high rate of metallic debris formation with longer follow-up, according to results.

Researchers developed a grading system to assess metallic debris formation in 68 patients who underwent total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) with 73 trabecular metal, porous tantalum glenoid components (Zimmer) and used radiographs of the previous generation of porous tantalum glenoid components that failed. Researchers evaluated glenoid components for signs of bone ingrowth and the formation of metallic debris.

Overall, researchers evaluated 90% of the 73 components at a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. Results showed 92.4% of components included had minimal or no glenoid radiolucency and 44% had a prevalence of metallic tantalum debris formation. Researchers found an increase in the incidence of metallic debris formation for each year of follow-up, with a metallic debris incidence of 23% at 2 years; 36% at 3 years; 49% at 4 years; and 52% at 5 years or more of follow-up. The severity of metallic debris formation also increased with follow-up duration, according to results. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.