In the Journals

Sternoclavicular joint pain likely a good indicator of arthropathy

Recently published study data indicated pain in the sternoclavicular joint was likely a good indication of arthropathy in the joint.

Researchers included 48 patients who were evaluated for atraumatic sternoclavicular (SC) joint pain at three hospitals between June 2011 and October 2013 in the study. Patients were evaluated for local swelling, pain at palpation, pain during arm elevation, pain during active scapular protraction and pain during active scapular retraction; CT images were also reviewed. The patients were then assigned to groups based on whether they experienced 50% or more decrease in pain after SC injection.

Overall, 44 patients (92%) were determined to have SC abnormalities causing pain based on response to treatment. Patients with pain on palpation exhibited the highest sensitivity at 93%. The highest specificity was found in patients with local swelling (100%). Patients with pain during active scapular protraction exhibited 86% sensitivity, whereas sensitivity of CT scans was 84%.

The dominant shoulder was involved in 40 cases (83%), and the non-dominant arm was affected in eight (17%), according to the researchers. – by Christian Ingram

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Recently published study data indicated pain in the sternoclavicular joint was likely a good indication of arthropathy in the joint.

Researchers included 48 patients who were evaluated for atraumatic sternoclavicular (SC) joint pain at three hospitals between June 2011 and October 2013 in the study. Patients were evaluated for local swelling, pain at palpation, pain during arm elevation, pain during active scapular protraction and pain during active scapular retraction; CT images were also reviewed. The patients were then assigned to groups based on whether they experienced 50% or more decrease in pain after SC injection.

Overall, 44 patients (92%) were determined to have SC abnormalities causing pain based on response to treatment. Patients with pain on palpation exhibited the highest sensitivity at 93%. The highest specificity was found in patients with local swelling (100%). Patients with pain during active scapular protraction exhibited 86% sensitivity, whereas sensitivity of CT scans was 84%.

The dominant shoulder was involved in 40 cases (83%), and the non-dominant arm was affected in eight (17%), according to the researchers. – by Christian Ingram

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.