In the Journals

RSA, TSA may be effective treatments for patients older than 80 years

According to recently published data, patients older than 80 years saw similar improvements for functional outcome scores, pain scores and range of motion within 2 years of follow-up after they underwent either total shoulder arthroplasty or reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

Researchers retrospectively evaluated data collected prospectively of 18 patients who underwent total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and 33 patients who underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). All patients were over 80 years old. The efficacy of the surgery was determined by the evaluation of clinical outcome scores preoperatively and postoperatively which included VAS score, American Shoulder and Elbow Society (ASES) score, Simple Shoulder Test score, Subjective, Assessment Numeric Evaluation score, and range of motion (ROM).

Preoperative vs. postoperative changes for pain, function and ROM were compared with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The minimum follow-up was 2 years.

Results showed both procedures were effective for the treatment of preoperative morbidity. Significant improvements in pain, function and ROM scores were found in both groups, with the exception of the Simple Shoulder test scores in the TSA group. Patients who underwent TSA postoperatively outperformed those who underwent RSA for ASES scores, active elevation and active external rotation.

Overall, the effectiveness of both RSA and TSA was not significantly different for functional outcome scores, pain and ROM. Groups were not significantly different with regard to the development of perioperative medical conditions, length of hospital stay and need for intensive care unit stay. In the TSA group, there was one late complication, one patient at 6 years had a rotator cuff tear with no effect on outcomes while the RSA group had five early complications. Significantly higher rates of patient satisfaction with the procedure were seen in the TSA group, according to researchers. by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures:  Triplet reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other author’s relevant financial disclosures.

According to recently published data, patients older than 80 years saw similar improvements for functional outcome scores, pain scores and range of motion within 2 years of follow-up after they underwent either total shoulder arthroplasty or reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

Researchers retrospectively evaluated data collected prospectively of 18 patients who underwent total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and 33 patients who underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). All patients were over 80 years old. The efficacy of the surgery was determined by the evaluation of clinical outcome scores preoperatively and postoperatively which included VAS score, American Shoulder and Elbow Society (ASES) score, Simple Shoulder Test score, Subjective, Assessment Numeric Evaluation score, and range of motion (ROM).

Preoperative vs. postoperative changes for pain, function and ROM were compared with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The minimum follow-up was 2 years.

Results showed both procedures were effective for the treatment of preoperative morbidity. Significant improvements in pain, function and ROM scores were found in both groups, with the exception of the Simple Shoulder test scores in the TSA group. Patients who underwent TSA postoperatively outperformed those who underwent RSA for ASES scores, active elevation and active external rotation.

Overall, the effectiveness of both RSA and TSA was not significantly different for functional outcome scores, pain and ROM. Groups were not significantly different with regard to the development of perioperative medical conditions, length of hospital stay and need for intensive care unit stay. In the TSA group, there was one late complication, one patient at 6 years had a rotator cuff tear with no effect on outcomes while the RSA group had five early complications. Significantly higher rates of patient satisfaction with the procedure were seen in the TSA group, according to researchers. by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures:  Triplet reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other author’s relevant financial disclosures.