Meeting News

Most pitchers returned to sport after medial epicondyle ORIF

Anthony A. Romeo

NEW YORK —Most professional baseball pitchers were able to return to sport after open reduction and internal fixation of the medial epicondyle without a significant decline in most performance variables, according to results presented here.

Anthony A. Romeo, MD, and colleagues recorded demographic and performance data for 15 professional baseball pitchers who had a history of ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction and underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of the medial epicondyle.

In his presentation at the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting, Romeo noted 73% of patients returned to sport. Of these patients, 55% returned at the same level or higher. When comparing preoperative and postoperative performance, he added there were no significant differences in the primary performance outcome variables.

“There were no significant differences in the primary performance outcome measures that were seen between the cases and the controls, which are other pitchers who are matched in almost every way possible except for the surgery and complication,” Romeo said.

Although there were no differences between patients who underwent ORIF and controls in the primary performance measures, Romeo noted there was a statistically significant difference in the secondary performance measure of the number of innings pitched per year.

“The cases pitched fewer innings when compared to controls following open reduction and internal fixation,” Romeo said. – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Erickson BJ, et al. Paper 24. Presented at: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting; Oct. 17-19, 2019; New York.

 

Disclosure: Romeo reports he receives other financial or material support from the Arthroscopy Association of North America, Arthrex Inc. and Major League Baseball; research support from Aesculap/B.Braun, Arthrex Inc., Histogenics, Medipost, NuTech, OrthoSpace, Smith & Nephew and Zimmer; is a board or committee member for American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Atreon Orthopaedics and Orthopedics Today; receives IP royalties, is a paid consultant and paid presenter or speaker for Arthrex Inc.; is on the editorial or governing board for Orthopedics, Orthopedics Today, SAGE, SLACK Incorporated and Wolters Kluwer Health – Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; and receives publishing royalties, financial or material support from Saunders/Mosby-Elsevier and SLACK Incorporated.

Anthony A. Romeo

NEW YORK —Most professional baseball pitchers were able to return to sport after open reduction and internal fixation of the medial epicondyle without a significant decline in most performance variables, according to results presented here.

Anthony A. Romeo, MD, and colleagues recorded demographic and performance data for 15 professional baseball pitchers who had a history of ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction and underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of the medial epicondyle.

In his presentation at the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting, Romeo noted 73% of patients returned to sport. Of these patients, 55% returned at the same level or higher. When comparing preoperative and postoperative performance, he added there were no significant differences in the primary performance outcome variables.

“There were no significant differences in the primary performance outcome measures that were seen between the cases and the controls, which are other pitchers who are matched in almost every way possible except for the surgery and complication,” Romeo said.

Although there were no differences between patients who underwent ORIF and controls in the primary performance measures, Romeo noted there was a statistically significant difference in the secondary performance measure of the number of innings pitched per year.

“The cases pitched fewer innings when compared to controls following open reduction and internal fixation,” Romeo said. – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Erickson BJ, et al. Paper 24. Presented at: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting; Oct. 17-19, 2019; New York.

 

Disclosure: Romeo reports he receives other financial or material support from the Arthroscopy Association of North America, Arthrex Inc. and Major League Baseball; research support from Aesculap/B.Braun, Arthrex Inc., Histogenics, Medipost, NuTech, OrthoSpace, Smith & Nephew and Zimmer; is a board or committee member for American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Atreon Orthopaedics and Orthopedics Today; receives IP royalties, is a paid consultant and paid presenter or speaker for Arthrex Inc.; is on the editorial or governing board for Orthopedics, Orthopedics Today, SAGE, SLACK Incorporated and Wolters Kluwer Health – Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; and receives publishing royalties, financial or material support from Saunders/Mosby-Elsevier and SLACK Incorporated.

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