In the Journals

Nonoperative management of radial head and neck fractures may yield positive results

Researchers observed positive long-term outcomes with the nonoperative management of isolated stable radial head or neck fractures, according to recently published study data.

Using a prospective database of proximal radial fractures, researchers identified 100 patients who underwent nonoperative management of an isolated stable Mason type-1 (57 patients) or type-2 (43 patients) radial head or neck fracture during an 18-month span. The study’s primary metric evaluated was the DASH score.

At a mean follow-up of 10 years after injury, the average DASH and Oxford Elbow scores were 5.8 and 46, respectively. Additionally, 14% of patients reported stiffness, and 24% of patients reported some remaining pain at that time, according to the researchers.

Overall, 35% of patients had one or more comorbidities, and 69% of all injuries stemmed from a fall from standing height. Factors determined to worsen DASH values were increasing age, one or more comorbidities, advanced socioeconomic deprivation, increasing fracture displacement and participation in compensation litigation, according to the researchers.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.

Researchers observed positive long-term outcomes with the nonoperative management of isolated stable radial head or neck fractures, according to recently published study data.

Using a prospective database of proximal radial fractures, researchers identified 100 patients who underwent nonoperative management of an isolated stable Mason type-1 (57 patients) or type-2 (43 patients) radial head or neck fracture during an 18-month span. The study’s primary metric evaluated was the DASH score.

At a mean follow-up of 10 years after injury, the average DASH and Oxford Elbow scores were 5.8 and 46, respectively. Additionally, 14% of patients reported stiffness, and 24% of patients reported some remaining pain at that time, according to the researchers.

Overall, 35% of patients had one or more comorbidities, and 69% of all injuries stemmed from a fall from standing height. Factors determined to worsen DASH values were increasing age, one or more comorbidities, advanced socioeconomic deprivation, increasing fracture displacement and participation in compensation litigation, according to the researchers.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.