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Elbow hemiarthroplasty for distal humerus fractures yielded successful outcomes

Mark A. Schrumpf
Mark A. Schrumpf

NEW YORK — Patients with comminuted intra-articular distal humerus fractures who underwent elbow hemiarthroplasty experienced good, early successful functional outcomes, according to results presented here.

Mark A. Schrumpf, MD, and colleagues obtained preoperative radiographs and CT scans of eight patients with comminuted intra-articular distal humerus fractures who underwent elbow hemiarthroplasty between 2015 and 2019. Schrumpf noted that a triceps-on approach was used in all cases. Researchers evaluated patient records, radiographs and physical exams for postoperative pain, function, stability, satisfaction and complications, and limitations of elbow function postoperatively were determined by the Mayo Elbow Performance Score.

Despite a 100% follow-up rate, Schrumpf noted three patients were excluded due to insufficient follow-up.

“Of the five patients we did get back for follow-up, their average age was 71 years and 100% of them were females, speaking to the potential for osteoporosis,” Schrumpf said in his presentation at the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting. “The average follow-up in these patients was just short of 3 years.”

Schrumpf noted patients had excellent range of motion with 130° of flexion, 17° of extension, and near full supination and pronation. He added patients had a Mayo Elbow Performance Score of 88.3. Although the study cohort experienced no complications, Schrumpf noted one of the three excluded patients had a repeat fall before the 1-year mark and was revised to a total elbow arthroplasty with the insertion of an ulnar component with retention of the humeral component.

“We had no further complications in this patient, and she went on to do well after her second surgical session,” Schrumpf said. – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

Schrumpf MA, et al. Paper 15. Presented at: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting; Oct. 17-19, 2019; New York.

Disclosure: Schrumpf reports he receives IP royalties from Shoulder Innovations.

Mark A. Schrumpf
Mark A. Schrumpf

NEW YORK — Patients with comminuted intra-articular distal humerus fractures who underwent elbow hemiarthroplasty experienced good, early successful functional outcomes, according to results presented here.

Mark A. Schrumpf, MD, and colleagues obtained preoperative radiographs and CT scans of eight patients with comminuted intra-articular distal humerus fractures who underwent elbow hemiarthroplasty between 2015 and 2019. Schrumpf noted that a triceps-on approach was used in all cases. Researchers evaluated patient records, radiographs and physical exams for postoperative pain, function, stability, satisfaction and complications, and limitations of elbow function postoperatively were determined by the Mayo Elbow Performance Score.

Despite a 100% follow-up rate, Schrumpf noted three patients were excluded due to insufficient follow-up.

“Of the five patients we did get back for follow-up, their average age was 71 years and 100% of them were females, speaking to the potential for osteoporosis,” Schrumpf said in his presentation at the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting. “The average follow-up in these patients was just short of 3 years.”

Schrumpf noted patients had excellent range of motion with 130° of flexion, 17° of extension, and near full supination and pronation. He added patients had a Mayo Elbow Performance Score of 88.3. Although the study cohort experienced no complications, Schrumpf noted one of the three excluded patients had a repeat fall before the 1-year mark and was revised to a total elbow arthroplasty with the insertion of an ulnar component with retention of the humeral component.

“We had no further complications in this patient, and she went on to do well after her second surgical session,” Schrumpf said. – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

Schrumpf MA, et al. Paper 15. Presented at: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting; Oct. 17-19, 2019; New York.

Disclosure: Schrumpf reports he receives IP royalties from Shoulder Innovations.

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