Meeting News

Hybrid-cage glenoid prosthesis yielded similar or better outcomes vs cemented peg glenoid for TSA

Richard J. Friedman

NEW ORLEANS — Similar, and at times better, clinical outcomes were found among patients who underwent total shoulder arthroplasty with a hybrid-cage glenoid prosthesis vs. a cemented peg glenoid prosthesis, according to a presenter at the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting.

Richard J. Friedman, MD, FRCSC , and colleagues compared 298 patients who underwent total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) with a hybrid-cage glenoid prosthesis to a cohort of 298 patients who received a cemented peg glenoid prosthesis. The groups were matched for age, gender and follow-up time. Researchers measured simple shoulder test, UCLA, ASES, Constant and shoulder pain and disability index metrics preoperatively and at latest follow-up. Researchers also measured active abduction, forward flexion, and active and passive external rotation.

Friedman noted statistically significant improvements in both groups with regard to all five metrics and range of motion measurements from preoperative to postoperative values.

“When we compared the preoperative outcomes between the peg and the cage, the cage glenoid patients were statistically better in most outcomes, but these statistical differences are not likely to be clinically significant,” Friedman said.

He added that the hybrid-cage glenoid group had statistically better postoperative outcomes compared with the cemented peg group, although these results were also unlikely to be clinically significant.

According to Friedman, patients in the hybrid-cage glenoid group had significantly lower rates of radiolucent lines, as well as significantly lower average radiolucent line scores. Patients in the hybrid-cage glenoid group had a complication rate of 4.3% vs. a rate of 7.7% for the patients in the cemented peg group, Friedman said. – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

Friedman RJ, et al. Paper #3. Presented at: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting. Oct. 12-14, 2017; New Orleans.

Disclosure: Friedman reports he is a board or committee member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Association and Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons; is a paid consultant for Exactech Inc. and Johnson & Johnson; is a paid presenter or speaker for Exactech Inc.; and receives research support from Exactech Inc. and Pacira.

Richard J. Friedman

NEW ORLEANS — Similar, and at times better, clinical outcomes were found among patients who underwent total shoulder arthroplasty with a hybrid-cage glenoid prosthesis vs. a cemented peg glenoid prosthesis, according to a presenter at the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting.

Richard J. Friedman, MD, FRCSC , and colleagues compared 298 patients who underwent total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) with a hybrid-cage glenoid prosthesis to a cohort of 298 patients who received a cemented peg glenoid prosthesis. The groups were matched for age, gender and follow-up time. Researchers measured simple shoulder test, UCLA, ASES, Constant and shoulder pain and disability index metrics preoperatively and at latest follow-up. Researchers also measured active abduction, forward flexion, and active and passive external rotation.

Friedman noted statistically significant improvements in both groups with regard to all five metrics and range of motion measurements from preoperative to postoperative values.

“When we compared the preoperative outcomes between the peg and the cage, the cage glenoid patients were statistically better in most outcomes, but these statistical differences are not likely to be clinically significant,” Friedman said.

He added that the hybrid-cage glenoid group had statistically better postoperative outcomes compared with the cemented peg group, although these results were also unlikely to be clinically significant.

According to Friedman, patients in the hybrid-cage glenoid group had significantly lower rates of radiolucent lines, as well as significantly lower average radiolucent line scores. Patients in the hybrid-cage glenoid group had a complication rate of 4.3% vs. a rate of 7.7% for the patients in the cemented peg group, Friedman said. – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

Friedman RJ, et al. Paper #3. Presented at: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting. Oct. 12-14, 2017; New Orleans.

Disclosure: Friedman reports he is a board or committee member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Association and Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons; is a paid consultant for Exactech Inc. and Johnson & Johnson; is a paid presenter or speaker for Exactech Inc.; and receives research support from Exactech Inc. and Pacira.

    See more from American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting