In the Journals

Reverse shoulder arthroplasty in patients with biconcave glenoid shows good midterm results

Researchers performed reverse shoulder arthroplasty in patients with a biconcave glenoid and primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis and found excellent clinical outcomes at mean 54-month follow-up, according to results of this study.

“Reverse shoulder arthroplasty in this setting results in good clinical outcomes with minimal complications at intermediate-term follow-up,” Naoko Mizuno, MD, and colleagues wrote in the study. “This technique provides a promising alternative solution to address the static posterior instability and glenoid erosion observed in the setting of primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis in a patient with a biconcave glenoid.”

Mizuno and colleagues retrospectively examined the cases of 28 patients who underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) between 1998 and 2009, according to the abstract. The patients were mean 74.1 years old and 81% were female. Every patient received a CT arthrogram to measure the mean preoperative retroversion and humeral head subluxation, which was 32° and 87%, respectively.

At latest follow-up, the mean Constant score increased from 31 points to 76 points postoperatively and patients had significantly increased external rotation, internatal rotation and active forward flexion. The researchers did not identify any radiolucent lines around the central peg or screws of the glenoid component, according to the abstract. One patient had early glenoid loosening and three patients had neurological complications.

Disclosure: One of the authors (Walch) received funds from Tornier for his work on this study.

Researchers performed reverse shoulder arthroplasty in patients with a biconcave glenoid and primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis and found excellent clinical outcomes at mean 54-month follow-up, according to results of this study.

“Reverse shoulder arthroplasty in this setting results in good clinical outcomes with minimal complications at intermediate-term follow-up,” Naoko Mizuno, MD, and colleagues wrote in the study. “This technique provides a promising alternative solution to address the static posterior instability and glenoid erosion observed in the setting of primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis in a patient with a biconcave glenoid.”

Mizuno and colleagues retrospectively examined the cases of 28 patients who underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) between 1998 and 2009, according to the abstract. The patients were mean 74.1 years old and 81% were female. Every patient received a CT arthrogram to measure the mean preoperative retroversion and humeral head subluxation, which was 32° and 87%, respectively.

At latest follow-up, the mean Constant score increased from 31 points to 76 points postoperatively and patients had significantly increased external rotation, internatal rotation and active forward flexion. The researchers did not identify any radiolucent lines around the central peg or screws of the glenoid component, according to the abstract. One patient had early glenoid loosening and three patients had neurological complications.

Disclosure: One of the authors (Walch) received funds from Tornier for his work on this study.