In the Journals

Osteoporotic hip fracture incidence declined in Australia

In Australia, the uptake of bisphosphonates and the rollout of public health campaigns and strategies that address osteoporosis may have led to a decrease in the age-standardized incidence of osteoporotic hip fracture, according to recent study results.

Researchers obtained data for persons aged 50 years and older with low-trauma hip fractures from the National Hospital Morbidity Database and used them to calculate age-standardized incidence rates for these fractures. They also applied a linear test for trend, according to the abstract.

Based on the results, between 1997 and 1998 and 2006 and 2007 the absolute number of hip fracture cases increased from 14,769 to 16,412. However, these numbers have narrowed and are lower than previous predictions based on population aging, according to the researchers.

Study results showed the age-standardized fracture incidence in women declined 20%, from 370 to 295 fractures per 100,000 fractures over the 10 year period, and the age-standardized incidence in men declined 13%, from 200 to 174 fractures per 100,000 fractures.

“Both declines were statistically significant,” the investigators wrote in the abstract.

In Australia, the uptake of bisphosphonates and the rollout of public health campaigns and strategies that address osteoporosis may have led to a decrease in the age-standardized incidence of osteoporotic hip fracture, according to recent study results.

Researchers obtained data for persons aged 50 years and older with low-trauma hip fractures from the National Hospital Morbidity Database and used them to calculate age-standardized incidence rates for these fractures. They also applied a linear test for trend, according to the abstract.

Based on the results, between 1997 and 1998 and 2006 and 2007 the absolute number of hip fracture cases increased from 14,769 to 16,412. However, these numbers have narrowed and are lower than previous predictions based on population aging, according to the researchers.

Study results showed the age-standardized fracture incidence in women declined 20%, from 370 to 295 fractures per 100,000 fractures over the 10 year period, and the age-standardized incidence in men declined 13%, from 200 to 174 fractures per 100,000 fractures.

“Both declines were statistically significant,” the investigators wrote in the abstract.