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PROMIS scores show lower function for patients with sarcoma vs general population

LAS VEGAS —PROMIS measures obtained for patients with a diagnosis of non-metastatic sarcoma showed some key differences in two domains compared to the general U.S. population, based on results presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting, here.

“We did find a few statistically significant differences in our non-metastatic sarcoma cohort compared to the United States general population. While these patients are reporting lower physical function they, however, are reporting lower depression levels compared to the United States general population,” Benjamin Wilke, MD, of Jacksonville, Florida, said.

Wilke and his colleagues used the NIH-developed patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS) tool to evaluate how patients with non-metastatic sarcoma perceived their health vs. the general U.S. population.

They looked at 604 patients who presented to the orthopedic clinic once the group started collecting PROMIS scores in September 2016. The investigators categorized those patients into an early group of patients, who were recently diagnosed, and a late group of patients, who were more than 2 years from their surgical date. According to Wilke, those groups were similar except for their date of surgery.

Among the seven domains studied — physical function, anxiety, depression, fatigue, sleep disturbance, the ability to participate in normal social activities, and manner and appearance — Wilke said a few differences were identified.

For physical function, both the early and late sarcoma groups reported lower physical function scores vs. the U.S general population.

“What this is telling us is these patients report themselves as having lower levels of physical function compared to the United States general population. When we look at the depression, we also found lower scores in the depression domains in both the early and the late cohorts. Compared to the physical function, where that is a negative attribute, this however indicates that these patients identify themselves as having lower levels of depression compared to the United States general population,” Wilke said. – by Susan M. Rapp

Reference:

Wilke B, et al. Abstract 131. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; March 12-16, 2019; Las Vegas.

Disclosure: Wilke reports no relevant financial disclosures.

LAS VEGAS —PROMIS measures obtained for patients with a diagnosis of non-metastatic sarcoma showed some key differences in two domains compared to the general U.S. population, based on results presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting, here.

“We did find a few statistically significant differences in our non-metastatic sarcoma cohort compared to the United States general population. While these patients are reporting lower physical function they, however, are reporting lower depression levels compared to the United States general population,” Benjamin Wilke, MD, of Jacksonville, Florida, said.

Wilke and his colleagues used the NIH-developed patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS) tool to evaluate how patients with non-metastatic sarcoma perceived their health vs. the general U.S. population.

They looked at 604 patients who presented to the orthopedic clinic once the group started collecting PROMIS scores in September 2016. The investigators categorized those patients into an early group of patients, who were recently diagnosed, and a late group of patients, who were more than 2 years from their surgical date. According to Wilke, those groups were similar except for their date of surgery.

Among the seven domains studied — physical function, anxiety, depression, fatigue, sleep disturbance, the ability to participate in normal social activities, and manner and appearance — Wilke said a few differences were identified.

For physical function, both the early and late sarcoma groups reported lower physical function scores vs. the U.S general population.

“What this is telling us is these patients report themselves as having lower levels of physical function compared to the United States general population. When we look at the depression, we also found lower scores in the depression domains in both the early and the late cohorts. Compared to the physical function, where that is a negative attribute, this however indicates that these patients identify themselves as having lower levels of depression compared to the United States general population,” Wilke said. – by Susan M. Rapp

Reference:

Wilke B, et al. Abstract 131. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; March 12-16, 2019; Las Vegas.

Disclosure: Wilke reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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