In the Journals

Intraosseous lesions may be linked with osteochondromas

Recently published data established a tentative link between patients exhibiting multiple osteochondromas and intraosseous chondroid lesions.

Investigators retrospectively culled information from a Dutch osteochondroma database for 195 patients who demonstrated proven intraosseous atypical chondroid tumors or chondrosarcomas. Clinical, imaging, histological and genetic data, along with patient demographic information, were noted.

Overall, seven (3.6%) patients classified as having a WHO grade 1 intraosseous atypical chondroid tumor or chondrosarcoma. These patients had a mean age of 42, and five (71.43%) were male.

Of the seven patients, six underwent surgical treatment and one was scheduled for surgery following a biopsy as well as histologic confirmation of the necessity of the surgery. Radiographic and genetic data indicated multiple osteochondromas, not metachondromatosis, in all of these patients.

Three of the patients exhibited exostosin-1 and four patients exhibited exostosin-2 mutations, according to the researchers. None of the patients were found to have protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 11 mutations.

After a mean follow-up of 4 years, no complications or recurrences were observed in the patients who underwent surgery. – by Christian Ingram

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.

Recently published data established a tentative link between patients exhibiting multiple osteochondromas and intraosseous chondroid lesions.

Investigators retrospectively culled information from a Dutch osteochondroma database for 195 patients who demonstrated proven intraosseous atypical chondroid tumors or chondrosarcomas. Clinical, imaging, histological and genetic data, along with patient demographic information, were noted.

Overall, seven (3.6%) patients classified as having a WHO grade 1 intraosseous atypical chondroid tumor or chondrosarcoma. These patients had a mean age of 42, and five (71.43%) were male.

Of the seven patients, six underwent surgical treatment and one was scheduled for surgery following a biopsy as well as histologic confirmation of the necessity of the surgery. Radiographic and genetic data indicated multiple osteochondromas, not metachondromatosis, in all of these patients.

Three of the patients exhibited exostosin-1 and four patients exhibited exostosin-2 mutations, according to the researchers. None of the patients were found to have protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 11 mutations.

After a mean follow-up of 4 years, no complications or recurrences were observed in the patients who underwent surgery. – by Christian Ingram

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.