First U.S. trauma patients treated with IlluminOSS system

IlluminOSS Medical recently announced the first two U.S. patients successfully underwent treatment using the IlluminOSS system to fix certain fractures of the humerus.

Felix Cheung, MD, an associate professor and chief of the orthopedic oncology division at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, performed both procedures. The surgeries were part of the U.S. Lightfix clinical trial, which allows the use of the minimally invasive IlluminOSS system to treat impending and pathologic humeral fractures stemming from metastatic carcinoma.

The IlluminOSS system provides fracture fixation via intramedullary implants specific to each patient that use a light-curable polymer within a balloon catheter. The cancer-affected bones are internally supported in a way that conforms to the patient to provide enhanced fixation. Additionally, the system allows for smaller incisions, shorter procedure times and hospital stays, lower complication rates and quicker postoperative mobility, according to a company press release.

“We have had tremendously successful results treating complex fractures with the IlluminOss System internationally and are excited to now begin applying it to the treatment of patients with impending and pathologic fractures in our first U.S. trial,” Robert Rabiner, president of IlluminOss Medical, said in the release. “The Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine is renowned for its commitment to providing excellence in both medical education and patient care, and we are appreciative for the opportunity to work with such a well-respected team, led by Dr. Cheung, to help validate the effectiveness of our technology in the U.S.”

Reference: www.illuminoss.com.

IlluminOSS Medical recently announced the first two U.S. patients successfully underwent treatment using the IlluminOSS system to fix certain fractures of the humerus.

Felix Cheung, MD, an associate professor and chief of the orthopedic oncology division at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, performed both procedures. The surgeries were part of the U.S. Lightfix clinical trial, which allows the use of the minimally invasive IlluminOSS system to treat impending and pathologic humeral fractures stemming from metastatic carcinoma.

The IlluminOSS system provides fracture fixation via intramedullary implants specific to each patient that use a light-curable polymer within a balloon catheter. The cancer-affected bones are internally supported in a way that conforms to the patient to provide enhanced fixation. Additionally, the system allows for smaller incisions, shorter procedure times and hospital stays, lower complication rates and quicker postoperative mobility, according to a company press release.

Other surgical sites throughout the country are currently enrolling patients for the Lightfix trial.

“We have had tremendously successful results treating complex fractures with the IlluminOss System internationally and are excited to now begin applying it to the treatment of patients with impending and pathologic fractures in our first U.S. trial,” Robert Rabiner, president of IlluminOss Medical, said in the release. “The Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine is renowned for its commitment to providing excellence in both medical education and patient care, and we are appreciative for the opportunity to work with such a well-respected team, led by Dr. Cheung, to help validate the effectiveness of our technology in the U.S.”

Reference: www.illuminoss.com.