In the JournalsFrom OT Europe

TKA with medial release for severe varus deformity may yield good midterm results

Sebastian Lustig headshot
Sébastien Lustig

Patients with severe varus deformity who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty with appropriate medial release may experience good midterm results, according to published results.

“The implantation of low-constraint, primary TKA components in patients with a preoperative varus deformity of more than 15° can achieve equivalent results to a TKA performed on a normal axis knee, but with a greater risk of patellar fractures,” Sébastien Lustig, MD, PhD, co-author of the study, told Healio.com/Orthopedics.

Lustig and colleagues categorized patients who underwent primary TKA into whether they had a normal axis of approximately 180° (n=673) or a preoperative varus of 15° or greater (n=280). Researchers performed anterior medial arthrotomy combined with controlled medial release in patients with varus deformity. Researchers compared clinical and radiological characteristics between the two groups at 2 months, 1 year and every 2 years after surgery.

Although patients in the normal axis group had a statistically higher mean preoperative Knee Society Score, results showed no significant differences with postoperative Knee Society Score between the two groups. Researchers found both groups had an identical rate of satisfaction. The varus group had more patellar fractures at midterm, according to results, and both the varus group and patients with patellar fractures had a significantly lower patellar height. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: Lustig reports he is a consultant for Smith & Nephew and receives institutional research support from Tornier-Wright and Amplitude. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Sebastian Lustig headshot
Sébastien Lustig

Patients with severe varus deformity who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty with appropriate medial release may experience good midterm results, according to published results.

“The implantation of low-constraint, primary TKA components in patients with a preoperative varus deformity of more than 15° can achieve equivalent results to a TKA performed on a normal axis knee, but with a greater risk of patellar fractures,” Sébastien Lustig, MD, PhD, co-author of the study, told Healio.com/Orthopedics.

Lustig and colleagues categorized patients who underwent primary TKA into whether they had a normal axis of approximately 180° (n=673) or a preoperative varus of 15° or greater (n=280). Researchers performed anterior medial arthrotomy combined with controlled medial release in patients with varus deformity. Researchers compared clinical and radiological characteristics between the two groups at 2 months, 1 year and every 2 years after surgery.

Although patients in the normal axis group had a statistically higher mean preoperative Knee Society Score, results showed no significant differences with postoperative Knee Society Score between the two groups. Researchers found both groups had an identical rate of satisfaction. The varus group had more patellar fractures at midterm, according to results, and both the varus group and patients with patellar fractures had a significantly lower patellar height. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: Lustig reports he is a consultant for Smith & Nephew and receives institutional research support from Tornier-Wright and Amplitude. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.