In the Journals

Electronic sensor device linked with reduced rate of manipulation under anesthesia after TKA

Recently published results showed a statistically significant reduction in the rate of manipulation under anesthesia when an electronic ligament sensor-balancing device was used during total knee arthroplasty.

Researchers compared 252 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with an electronic ligament sensor-balancing device (Verasense, OrthoSensor Inc.) to a cohort of 690 patients undergoing TKA without the use of the sensor.

Results showed patients in the non-sensor group had a rate of manipulation under anesthesia for early arthrofibrosis of 5% vs. 1.6% in the sensor group. Researchers found an average time to manipulation under anesthesia of 13.5 weeks and 7.5 weeks for the non-sensor and sensor groups, respectively. Researchers noted 62% of manipulations occurred within the 90-day postoperative interval. Patients in the non-sensor group had a 3.2-times higher likelihood of requiring manipulation under anesthesia vs. patients in the senor group, according to odds ratio analysis. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: Geller reports that he is a paid consultant for Smith and Nephew and Orthosensor; receives research support from Smith and Nephew, Orthosensor, Orthopaedic Scientific Research Foundation and Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation; is on the editorial or governing board for Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research and Journal of Arthroplasty; and is a board or committee member for the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons and the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Recently published results showed a statistically significant reduction in the rate of manipulation under anesthesia when an electronic ligament sensor-balancing device was used during total knee arthroplasty.

Researchers compared 252 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with an electronic ligament sensor-balancing device (Verasense, OrthoSensor Inc.) to a cohort of 690 patients undergoing TKA without the use of the sensor.

Results showed patients in the non-sensor group had a rate of manipulation under anesthesia for early arthrofibrosis of 5% vs. 1.6% in the sensor group. Researchers found an average time to manipulation under anesthesia of 13.5 weeks and 7.5 weeks for the non-sensor and sensor groups, respectively. Researchers noted 62% of manipulations occurred within the 90-day postoperative interval. Patients in the non-sensor group had a 3.2-times higher likelihood of requiring manipulation under anesthesia vs. patients in the senor group, according to odds ratio analysis. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: Geller reports that he is a paid consultant for Smith and Nephew and Orthosensor; receives research support from Smith and Nephew, Orthosensor, Orthopaedic Scientific Research Foundation and Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation; is on the editorial or governing board for Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research and Journal of Arthroplasty; and is a board or committee member for the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons and the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.