In the Journals

Similar early analgesia effect seen after TKA with single-injection adductor canal block vs continuous adductor canal blockade

Single-injection adductor canal block provided a similar analgesia effect as continuous adductor canal blockade for up to 36 hours after block placement in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty. However, at 42 hours and after, the continuous adductor canal blockade was more favorable, according to recently published results.

Researchers performed a double-blinded, randomized, controlled equivalency trial of 60 patients who underwent TKA. Patients were assigned to receive either the single-injection adductor canal block (SACB) or continuous adductor canal blockade (CACB). Movement pain score measured with the numeric rating scale (NRS) at 30 hours was the primary outcome. Other outcomes included serial postoperative NRS pain score, opioid consumption, time to first opioid administration, ability to straight leg raise, patient satisfaction, length of stay and incidence of nausea and vomiting.

There was an intention-to-treat analysis performed for 59 patients. Investigators noted at 30 hours, the NRS pain scores with movement were equivalent in patients treated with SACB and CACB. In addition, all NRS pain scores were similar until 42 hours. At 48 hours, patients treated with CACB had lower pain at rest and movement scores. There were no statistical differences in other outcomes assessed. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Single-injection adductor canal block provided a similar analgesia effect as continuous adductor canal blockade for up to 36 hours after block placement in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty. However, at 42 hours and after, the continuous adductor canal blockade was more favorable, according to recently published results.

Researchers performed a double-blinded, randomized, controlled equivalency trial of 60 patients who underwent TKA. Patients were assigned to receive either the single-injection adductor canal block (SACB) or continuous adductor canal blockade (CACB). Movement pain score measured with the numeric rating scale (NRS) at 30 hours was the primary outcome. Other outcomes included serial postoperative NRS pain score, opioid consumption, time to first opioid administration, ability to straight leg raise, patient satisfaction, length of stay and incidence of nausea and vomiting.

There was an intention-to-treat analysis performed for 59 patients. Investigators noted at 30 hours, the NRS pain scores with movement were equivalent in patients treated with SACB and CACB. In addition, all NRS pain scores were similar until 42 hours. At 48 hours, patients treated with CACB had lower pain at rest and movement scores. There were no statistical differences in other outcomes assessed. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.