In the Journals

Adductor canal block plus periarticular injection for TKA did not impact time to hospital discharge

The addition of an adductor canal block to periarticular injection for total knee replacement did not significantly impact the time to meet discharge criteria, according to recently published results.

Patients who received the adductor canal block and periarticular injection had lower worst pain and more pain relief at 24 hours after anesthesia compared with patients who received only the periarticular injection.

Among patients who underwent TKA, researchers enrolled 56 patients to receive a periarticular injection and 55 patients to receive an adductor canal block and periarticular injection. Intraoperative neuraxial anesthesia and pharmaceutical analgesics were used in both treatment groups. Time to reach discharge criteria was the primary outcome. Other outcomes collected on postoperative day 1 and day 2 included the numeric rating scale pain scores, the pain out questionnaire, opioid consumption and opioid-related side effects.

Results showed no difference between the groups with regard to time to reach discharge criteria. Investigators noted the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney odds ratio was 0.87. Mean time to achieve discharge criteria was 25.8 hours for patients who received the adductor canal block and periarticular injection compared with 26.4 hours in patients who received a periarticular injection. At 24 hours after anesthesia, lower worst pain and more pain relief were seen in patients who received an adductor canal block and periarticular injection. Opioid consumption, opioid-related side effects and numeric rating scale pain scores were not significantly different between the treatment groups. – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

The addition of an adductor canal block to periarticular injection for total knee replacement did not significantly impact the time to meet discharge criteria, according to recently published results.

Patients who received the adductor canal block and periarticular injection had lower worst pain and more pain relief at 24 hours after anesthesia compared with patients who received only the periarticular injection.

Among patients who underwent TKA, researchers enrolled 56 patients to receive a periarticular injection and 55 patients to receive an adductor canal block and periarticular injection. Intraoperative neuraxial anesthesia and pharmaceutical analgesics were used in both treatment groups. Time to reach discharge criteria was the primary outcome. Other outcomes collected on postoperative day 1 and day 2 included the numeric rating scale pain scores, the pain out questionnaire, opioid consumption and opioid-related side effects.

Results showed no difference between the groups with regard to time to reach discharge criteria. Investigators noted the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney odds ratio was 0.87. Mean time to achieve discharge criteria was 25.8 hours for patients who received the adductor canal block and periarticular injection compared with 26.4 hours in patients who received a periarticular injection. At 24 hours after anesthesia, lower worst pain and more pain relief were seen in patients who received an adductor canal block and periarticular injection. Opioid consumption, opioid-related side effects and numeric rating scale pain scores were not significantly different between the treatment groups. – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.