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Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty yielded higher reoperation rate vs TKA

NEW ORLEANS — Despite similar WOMAC scores at 10 years, patients who underwent unicompartmental knee arthroplasty had a higher rate of reoperation for any reason compared with patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty, according to results presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

Among 103 unicompartmental knee arthroplasties (UKAs) and 72 TKAs, John L. Masonis, MD, and colleagues found no statistically significant differences in WOMAC pain, stiffness, function or total scores at 2 years postoperatively.

“The 10-year WOMAC scores are also similar, meaning that we see no significant difference in WOMAC pain, stiffness, function or total,” Masonis said. “Our 10-year KOOS scores were evaluated and the only significant difference that we found was in KOOS symptoms. There was a small difference in this in favor of the unicompartmental arthroplasty cohort.”

Masonis reported there was a reoperation rate of 8.4 among the UKA group and there were two revisions in the TKA group at 2 years postoperatively.

By 10 years postoperatively, the UKA group had undergone 17 revisions and the revision rate for the TKA group was 6.9, according to results. – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

Masonis JL, et al. Paper #493. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 6-10, 2018; New Orleans.

Disclosure: Masonis reports he is a board or committee member for the Anterior Hip Foundation; receives research support from DePuy Synthes, Smith & Nephew and Zimmer Biomet; is a paid consultant for Medacta, Smith & Nephew and Zimmer Biomet; receives IP royalties from Medacta, Smith & Nephew and Zimmer Biomet; and has stock or stock options in OrthoGrid Systems.

NEW ORLEANS — Despite similar WOMAC scores at 10 years, patients who underwent unicompartmental knee arthroplasty had a higher rate of reoperation for any reason compared with patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty, according to results presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

Among 103 unicompartmental knee arthroplasties (UKAs) and 72 TKAs, John L. Masonis, MD, and colleagues found no statistically significant differences in WOMAC pain, stiffness, function or total scores at 2 years postoperatively.

“The 10-year WOMAC scores are also similar, meaning that we see no significant difference in WOMAC pain, stiffness, function or total,” Masonis said. “Our 10-year KOOS scores were evaluated and the only significant difference that we found was in KOOS symptoms. There was a small difference in this in favor of the unicompartmental arthroplasty cohort.”

Masonis reported there was a reoperation rate of 8.4 among the UKA group and there were two revisions in the TKA group at 2 years postoperatively.

By 10 years postoperatively, the UKA group had undergone 17 revisions and the revision rate for the TKA group was 6.9, according to results. – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

Masonis JL, et al. Paper #493. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 6-10, 2018; New Orleans.

Disclosure: Masonis reports he is a board or committee member for the Anterior Hip Foundation; receives research support from DePuy Synthes, Smith & Nephew and Zimmer Biomet; is a paid consultant for Medacta, Smith & Nephew and Zimmer Biomet; receives IP royalties from Medacta, Smith & Nephew and Zimmer Biomet; and has stock or stock options in OrthoGrid Systems.

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