Gender, height and weight can determine meniscus sizing for transplantation

Considering such variables could offer tissue banks and surgeons a faster, cost-effective method for determining meniscal sizing compared to imaging techniques.

The gender, height and weight of both the recipient and the donor of a meniscal allograft can be used to determine meniscal graft sizing, according to a study by researchers in California.

Kevin R. Stone, MD, and colleagues at the Stone Research Foundation, San Francisco, and at Beverly Radiology, Los Angeles, compared the height and weight of patients undergoing meniscal transplants to preoperative MRI-based sizing of their menisci. They published their findings in Arthroscopy.

The study involved 147 menisci in 111 patients, including 63 men and 38 women averaging 44 years of age. Transplants were lateral in 87 cases and medial in 60 cases, according to the study.

An independent radiologist performed all meniscal sizings using MRI and radiographic bony landmarks and insertion points, the study authors noted.

The researchers found that patient height had a linear relationship with total tibial plateau width, "which has a highly predictive correlation with meniscal dimensions," the authors wrote.

Height also showed good correlation with total tibial plateau width, although the correlation was less significant. In addition, total tibial plateau showed good correlation with all medial and lateral measurements, but medial meniscus width had the highest correlation of all meniscal dimensions, according to the study.

Regarding gender, women generally had smaller total tibial plateau widths compared to men. But, "The variance observed at any given height can be adjusted by considering weight," the authors wrote.

"High-BMI (body mass index) groups present with significantly larger meniscal dimensions than low-BMI groups at any given height for all dimensions with the exception of medial meniscal length," they wrote.

"Within gender groups, at any given height, a variance was observed, reinforcing that height, though highly predictive, is not the sole determinant of meniscal dimensions. Weight, though fairly correlative with tibial plateau width and medial meniscal width, is less correlative than height. Gender should be considered in determining appropriate sizing," the authors wrote.

"Height, weight, and gender should be considered by both tissue banks and surgeons as a fast and cost-effective method for meniscal sizing," the authors conclude.

For more information:

  • Stone KR, Freyer A, Turek T, et al. Meniscal sizing based on gender, height and weight. Arthroscopy. 2007;23:503-508.

The gender, height and weight of both the recipient and the donor of a meniscal allograft can be used to determine meniscal graft sizing, according to a study by researchers in California.

Kevin R. Stone, MD, and colleagues at the Stone Research Foundation, San Francisco, and at Beverly Radiology, Los Angeles, compared the height and weight of patients undergoing meniscal transplants to preoperative MRI-based sizing of their menisci. They published their findings in Arthroscopy.

The study involved 147 menisci in 111 patients, including 63 men and 38 women averaging 44 years of age. Transplants were lateral in 87 cases and medial in 60 cases, according to the study.

An independent radiologist performed all meniscal sizings using MRI and radiographic bony landmarks and insertion points, the study authors noted.

The researchers found that patient height had a linear relationship with total tibial plateau width, "which has a highly predictive correlation with meniscal dimensions," the authors wrote.

Height also showed good correlation with total tibial plateau width, although the correlation was less significant. In addition, total tibial plateau showed good correlation with all medial and lateral measurements, but medial meniscus width had the highest correlation of all meniscal dimensions, according to the study.

Regarding gender, women generally had smaller total tibial plateau widths compared to men. But, "The variance observed at any given height can be adjusted by considering weight," the authors wrote.

"High-BMI (body mass index) groups present with significantly larger meniscal dimensions than low-BMI groups at any given height for all dimensions with the exception of medial meniscal length," they wrote.

"Within gender groups, at any given height, a variance was observed, reinforcing that height, though highly predictive, is not the sole determinant of meniscal dimensions. Weight, though fairly correlative with tibial plateau width and medial meniscal width, is less correlative than height. Gender should be considered in determining appropriate sizing," the authors wrote.

"Height, weight, and gender should be considered by both tissue banks and surgeons as a fast and cost-effective method for meniscal sizing," the authors conclude.

For more information:

  • Stone KR, Freyer A, Turek T, et al. Meniscal sizing based on gender, height and weight. Arthroscopy. 2007;23:503-508.