Meeting News

New cemented spacers may provide greater survival after two-stage exchange

Yi Loong Woon
Yi-Loong C. Woon

LAS VEGAS — Patients with periprosthetic joint infection who underwent two-stage exchange total knee arthroplasty experienced greater survival with spacers comprised of new cemented components compared with spacers comprised of autoclaved components. In addition, the spacers comprised of new cemented components showed a trend toward greater survival compared with cement-based spacers, according to results presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

Yi-Loong C. Woon , MD, and colleagues collected epidemiological data, recorded the interval to second-stage surgery, the infectious organism, revision status and outcome among 140 unilateral knees with periprosthetic joint infection that underwent two-stage exchange TKA. Patients either received cement-based spacers, spacers comprised of new implants or spacers comprised of autoclaved implants.

Woon noted Staphylococcus species were identified in 55% of patients, with Staphylococcus aureus in 31% of patients and MRSA in 9%.

“Looking across all three groups, we found no differences in median age at reimplantation, sex, BMI, revision status and species of organism,” Woon said in his presentation. “However, there was a difference in the median time to reimplantation.”

He noted a median post-reimplantation time to failure of 5.6 years, with 7 years among new spacers, 5 years with cement-based spacers and 4 years with autoclaved spacers. Woon added that they found no differences in success rates between primary and revision knees, as well as no differences with Staphylococcus-positive and Staphylococcus-negative implants. The overall spacer survival was 82%.

“New implants gave us a 96% survival, cement-based spacers [were] 81% and all the way at the bottom, autoclaved implants [with] 73%,” Woon said. – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Woon YC, et al. Abstract 003. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 12-16, 2019; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Woon reports no relevant financial disclosures.

Yi Loong Woon
Yi-Loong C. Woon

LAS VEGAS — Patients with periprosthetic joint infection who underwent two-stage exchange total knee arthroplasty experienced greater survival with spacers comprised of new cemented components compared with spacers comprised of autoclaved components. In addition, the spacers comprised of new cemented components showed a trend toward greater survival compared with cement-based spacers, according to results presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

Yi-Loong C. Woon , MD, and colleagues collected epidemiological data, recorded the interval to second-stage surgery, the infectious organism, revision status and outcome among 140 unilateral knees with periprosthetic joint infection that underwent two-stage exchange TKA. Patients either received cement-based spacers, spacers comprised of new implants or spacers comprised of autoclaved implants.

Woon noted Staphylococcus species were identified in 55% of patients, with Staphylococcus aureus in 31% of patients and MRSA in 9%.

“Looking across all three groups, we found no differences in median age at reimplantation, sex, BMI, revision status and species of organism,” Woon said in his presentation. “However, there was a difference in the median time to reimplantation.”

He noted a median post-reimplantation time to failure of 5.6 years, with 7 years among new spacers, 5 years with cement-based spacers and 4 years with autoclaved spacers. Woon added that they found no differences in success rates between primary and revision knees, as well as no differences with Staphylococcus-positive and Staphylococcus-negative implants. The overall spacer survival was 82%.

“New implants gave us a 96% survival, cement-based spacers [were] 81% and all the way at the bottom, autoclaved implants [with] 73%,” Woon said. – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Woon YC, et al. Abstract 003. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 12-16, 2019; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Woon reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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