In the JournalsPerspective

UKA prosthesis yielded promising midterm results for OA

A published study showed encouraging clinical results at midterm follow-up among patients who underwent unicompartmental knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the medial knee compartment.

Researchers performed survival analysis for 91 patients who underwent medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) with the Journey Uni prosthesis (Smith & Nephew) for OA at a minimum of 30 months postoperatively, and obtained patients’ oriented questionnaires and KOOS scores. Researchers also performed a retrospective chart review and radiological analysis of component alignment for all patients preoperatively and at 6 weeks postoperatively.

Among 69 patients available for clinical follow-up at a mean of 56 months postoperatively, results showed mean subscale scores between 71% and 91% for the KOOS and WOMAC. Researchers found 7.7% of patients underwent revision during the course of the follow-up period and underwent a total knee arthroplasty. After 48 months, researchers noted a survival rate for UKA of 90.5%, according to results of a Kaplan-Meier analysis. Radiographic analysis showed no differences in preoperative and postoperative posterior tibial slope.

“In this study, the midterm clinical outcome of the Journey Uni prosthesis showed promising results in concordance with similar studies on other prosthes[es],” the authors wrote. “Additionally, the [posterior tibial slope] PTS has been identified as a relevant anatomical parameter for clinical outcome. This study showed good reconstruction of individual PTS after UKA.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

A published study showed encouraging clinical results at midterm follow-up among patients who underwent unicompartmental knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the medial knee compartment.

Researchers performed survival analysis for 91 patients who underwent medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) with the Journey Uni prosthesis (Smith & Nephew) for OA at a minimum of 30 months postoperatively, and obtained patients’ oriented questionnaires and KOOS scores. Researchers also performed a retrospective chart review and radiological analysis of component alignment for all patients preoperatively and at 6 weeks postoperatively.

Among 69 patients available for clinical follow-up at a mean of 56 months postoperatively, results showed mean subscale scores between 71% and 91% for the KOOS and WOMAC. Researchers found 7.7% of patients underwent revision during the course of the follow-up period and underwent a total knee arthroplasty. After 48 months, researchers noted a survival rate for UKA of 90.5%, according to results of a Kaplan-Meier analysis. Radiographic analysis showed no differences in preoperative and postoperative posterior tibial slope.

“In this study, the midterm clinical outcome of the Journey Uni prosthesis showed promising results in concordance with similar studies on other prosthes[es],” the authors wrote. “Additionally, the [posterior tibial slope] PTS has been identified as a relevant anatomical parameter for clinical outcome. This study showed good reconstruction of individual PTS after UKA.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

    Perspective
    Jonathan M. Vigdorchik

    Jonathan M. Vigdorchik

    I read with great interest the article by Christian Ries, MD, and colleagues out of University Hospital of Cologne Germany regarding Mid-Term Clinical Outcome and Reconstruction of Posterior Tibial Slope after UKA.

    UKA has proven over the years to be an excellent procedure and a true resurfacing of the knee joint preserving the native kinematics. However, the outcomes of this procedure are very technique dependent and extremely sensitive to minor variations. This study looked at restoring physiologic varus by undercorrecting the full extent of the deformity and also at recreating the native posterior tibial slope. Clinical outcomes were excellent in the majority of patients with a 90.5% survivorship at 48 months, although 7% were revised to total knee arthroplasty. In orthopedic surgery, the more closely we recreate the natural anatomy, the quicker recovery and better outcomes for our patients. Surgeons are able to achieve these goals using conventional techniques, but robotics and computer technology have really helped fine-tune the execution of surgical plans with the additional benefit of increasing longevity and lowering failure rates, and this is especially the case with a technically challenging operation such as a UKA. This study proves to me the importance of recreating the native anatomy of the knee to restore more natural kinematics, and supports the literature and my belief that using robotics or computer-assisted technology will continue to advance the field of total joint arthroplasty, increase patient satisfaction, and lead to more natural feeling joint replacements.

     
    • Jonathan M. Vigdorchik, MD
    • Hip and Knee Surgeon
      Hospital for Special Surgery
      New York, NY

    Disclosures: Vigdorchik reports no relevant financial disclosures.