Meeting News

Next-generation sequencing less commonly identified P. acnes vs routine culture

PHILADELPHIA — Propionibacterium acnes from primary shoulder surgery was less commonly identified with next-generation sequencing compared with routine culture, according to results presented at the Musculoskeletal Infection Society Annual Open Scientific Meeting.

Thema Nicholson

“We only showed a fair concordance between culture and [next-generation sequencing] NGS for identification in P. acnes in the primary shoulder surgery,” Thema Nicholson, MD, said in her presentation here. “There was certainly a higher identification of rate in cultures. In NGS, results may be less effective than culture by deep tissue inoculation.”

Nicholson and colleagues collected tissue specimens from 45 patients undergoing primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and 45 patients undergoing primary anatomic shoulder arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. Researchers sent one specimen for culture and one specimen for next-generation sequencing.

“The osteoarthritis group was significantly older than our rotator cuff group, and there was no difference between gender or BMI,” Nicholson said in her presentation.

According to Nicholson, culture showed 18 cases were positive for P. acnes while next-generation sequencing showed seven cases were positive. Of the 18 cases positive for P. acnes by culture, she noted P. acnes was also identified in four of the cases with next-generation sequencing.

“For one or more specimen that came back positive for P. acnes, looking at culture, 10 in our OA group vs. eight in our rotator cuff group came back positive and, looking at NGS, 11 in our OA group vs. three in the rotator cuff group,” Nicholson said. – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Namdari S, et al. Propionibacterium acnes is less commonly identified by next-generation sequencing than culture in primary shoulder surgery. Presented at: Musculoskeletal Infection Society Annual Open Scientific Meeting; July 27-28, 2018; Philadelphia.

 

Disclosure: Nicholson reports no relevant financial disclosures.

PHILADELPHIA — Propionibacterium acnes from primary shoulder surgery was less commonly identified with next-generation sequencing compared with routine culture, according to results presented at the Musculoskeletal Infection Society Annual Open Scientific Meeting.

Thema Nicholson

“We only showed a fair concordance between culture and [next-generation sequencing] NGS for identification in P. acnes in the primary shoulder surgery,” Thema Nicholson, MD, said in her presentation here. “There was certainly a higher identification of rate in cultures. In NGS, results may be less effective than culture by deep tissue inoculation.”

Nicholson and colleagues collected tissue specimens from 45 patients undergoing primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and 45 patients undergoing primary anatomic shoulder arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. Researchers sent one specimen for culture and one specimen for next-generation sequencing.

“The osteoarthritis group was significantly older than our rotator cuff group, and there was no difference between gender or BMI,” Nicholson said in her presentation.

According to Nicholson, culture showed 18 cases were positive for P. acnes while next-generation sequencing showed seven cases were positive. Of the 18 cases positive for P. acnes by culture, she noted P. acnes was also identified in four of the cases with next-generation sequencing.

“For one or more specimen that came back positive for P. acnes, looking at culture, 10 in our OA group vs. eight in our rotator cuff group came back positive and, looking at NGS, 11 in our OA group vs. three in the rotator cuff group,” Nicholson said. – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Namdari S, et al. Propionibacterium acnes is less commonly identified by next-generation sequencing than culture in primary shoulder surgery. Presented at: Musculoskeletal Infection Society Annual Open Scientific Meeting; July 27-28, 2018; Philadelphia.

 

Disclosure: Nicholson reports no relevant financial disclosures.

    See more from Musculoskeletal Infection Society Annual Meeting