In the Journals

Time to antibiotics, coverage can predict infection of open-tibia fractures

Infection of type III open-tibia fractures was predicted by time from injury to antibiotics and to wound coverage, according to stud results.

Researchers retrospectively reviewed all Gustilo-Anderson type III open-tibia fractures treated at a level-one trauma center. After exclusions for missing data, nonreconstructible limbs or absence of 90-day outcome data, the researchers included 137 patients in their analysis. The study’s main outcome measure was deep infection within 90 days.

Results showed no association between age, smoking, diabetes, injury severity score, type IIIA vs. 3B/C injury and time to surgical debridement with infection on univariate analysis, according to the researchers. Univariate predictors of infection included greater than 5 days to wound coverage and greater than 66 minutes to antibiotics.

According to multivariate analysis findings, wound coverage beyond 5 days and antibiotics beyond 66 minutes independently predicted infection.

The researchers found the infection rate relative to delay in either factor or delay in both factors were limited by immediate antibiotics and early coverage. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.

Infection of type III open-tibia fractures was predicted by time from injury to antibiotics and to wound coverage, according to stud results.

Researchers retrospectively reviewed all Gustilo-Anderson type III open-tibia fractures treated at a level-one trauma center. After exclusions for missing data, nonreconstructible limbs or absence of 90-day outcome data, the researchers included 137 patients in their analysis. The study’s main outcome measure was deep infection within 90 days.

Results showed no association between age, smoking, diabetes, injury severity score, type IIIA vs. 3B/C injury and time to surgical debridement with infection on univariate analysis, according to the researchers. Univariate predictors of infection included greater than 5 days to wound coverage and greater than 66 minutes to antibiotics.

According to multivariate analysis findings, wound coverage beyond 5 days and antibiotics beyond 66 minutes independently predicted infection.

The researchers found the infection rate relative to delay in either factor or delay in both factors were limited by immediate antibiotics and early coverage. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.