In the Journals

Foot-worn biomechanical device improves gait results in THA patients

A non-invasive biomechanical device placed on the foot of patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty improved gait velocity, step length and single limb support after 26 weeks of therapy, according to this study.

“The results of this study showed promising outcomes including significant improvements in gait patterns, functional tests and self-evaluation questionnaires; however, future [randomized controlled trials] RCTs are warranted,” the researchers wrote in the study.

They added, “These RCTs should include a comparison of this therapy modality to other common modalities and also compare this therapy with a group of healthy controls. This will help determine and relate the improvement to the therapy.”

Of 19 patients enrolled in the study – some of whom were admitted 3 months postoperatively – 50.3% showed significantly improved gait velocity, 22.9% had significantly improved step length and 16.9% had significantly improved single limb support, according to the abstract. In addition, pain was significantly reduced in 85.4% of patients, significantly improvement in function in 81.1% and significantly quality of life improvements in 52.1%.

Disclosure: Debi, Elbaz and Mor are stock owners in AposTherapy.

A non-invasive biomechanical device placed on the foot of patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty improved gait velocity, step length and single limb support after 26 weeks of therapy, according to this study.

“The results of this study showed promising outcomes including significant improvements in gait patterns, functional tests and self-evaluation questionnaires; however, future [randomized controlled trials] RCTs are warranted,” the researchers wrote in the study.

They added, “These RCTs should include a comparison of this therapy modality to other common modalities and also compare this therapy with a group of healthy controls. This will help determine and relate the improvement to the therapy.”

Of 19 patients enrolled in the study – some of whom were admitted 3 months postoperatively – 50.3% showed significantly improved gait velocity, 22.9% had significantly improved step length and 16.9% had significantly improved single limb support, according to the abstract. In addition, pain was significantly reduced in 85.4% of patients, significantly improvement in function in 81.1% and significantly quality of life improvements in 52.1%.

Disclosure: Debi, Elbaz and Mor are stock owners in AposTherapy.