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Early reoperation after THA yielded higher risk for infection, wound complications

NEW ORLEANS — Patients who returned to the operating room within 90 days after primary total hip arthroplasty had a significantly higher risk for subsequent wound-related complications, according to results presented here.

“Infections and wound complications were 3.5 [times] more likely to occur if reoperation happened within 90 days and this level was even higher within the 14-day window,” Antonia F. Chen, MD, said at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

Based on the time interval from index surgery to reoperation, Chen and colleagues compared rates of infection and wound complications requiring irrigation and debridement or two-stage exchange within 90 days after mechanical reoperation of THA.

Antonia F. Chen

Among 192 patients included in the study, results showed a rate of infection of 11.8% and 7.8% for patients who underwent a mechanical reoperation less than 14 days and 90 days after index surgery, respectively. However, patients who underwent a mechanical reoperation of more than 90 days had rates of infection and wound complications of 2.2%, according to Chen. An infection rate of 1.5% was found among patients who underwent reoperation more than 180 days after primary THA.

“The further time from their initial surgery that you had to undergo mechanical reoperation, the less likely you were to have infection or wound complications,” Chen said. – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

Chen AF, et al. Paper #26. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 6-10, 2018; New Orleans.

 

Disclosure: Chen reports she is a board or committee member for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Joint Replacement Registry, American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons, European Knee Association, International Congress for Joint Reconstruction and Musculoskeletal Infection Society; a paid consultant for ACI, bOne, Convatec, DJ Orthopaedics, Haylard, Pfizer and Stryker; has stock or stock options with Graftworx, Joint Purification Systems and Sonoran; receives research support from Irrimax, Smith & Nephew and SterileBits; and receives publishing royalties, financial or material support from SLACK Incorporated.

NEW ORLEANS — Patients who returned to the operating room within 90 days after primary total hip arthroplasty had a significantly higher risk for subsequent wound-related complications, according to results presented here.

“Infections and wound complications were 3.5 [times] more likely to occur if reoperation happened within 90 days and this level was even higher within the 14-day window,” Antonia F. Chen, MD, said at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

Based on the time interval from index surgery to reoperation, Chen and colleagues compared rates of infection and wound complications requiring irrigation and debridement or two-stage exchange within 90 days after mechanical reoperation of THA.

Antonia F. Chen

Among 192 patients included in the study, results showed a rate of infection of 11.8% and 7.8% for patients who underwent a mechanical reoperation less than 14 days and 90 days after index surgery, respectively. However, patients who underwent a mechanical reoperation of more than 90 days had rates of infection and wound complications of 2.2%, according to Chen. An infection rate of 1.5% was found among patients who underwent reoperation more than 180 days after primary THA.

“The further time from their initial surgery that you had to undergo mechanical reoperation, the less likely you were to have infection or wound complications,” Chen said. – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

Chen AF, et al. Paper #26. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 6-10, 2018; New Orleans.

 

Disclosure: Chen reports she is a board or committee member for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Joint Replacement Registry, American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons, European Knee Association, International Congress for Joint Reconstruction and Musculoskeletal Infection Society; a paid consultant for ACI, bOne, Convatec, DJ Orthopaedics, Haylard, Pfizer and Stryker; has stock or stock options with Graftworx, Joint Purification Systems and Sonoran; receives research support from Irrimax, Smith & Nephew and SterileBits; and receives publishing royalties, financial or material support from SLACK Incorporated.

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