Perspective

Number of THA procedures significantly increased since 2000

Recently published data show the quantity of total hip arthroplasty procedures performed in 2010 represent a significant increase from the number performed in 2000.

According to the National Hospital Discharge Survey, 326,100 patients underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) in 2010 — an increase from approximately 142,000 in 2000. The increase in THA procedures ranged from 92% among patients 75 years of age and older to 205% in those from 45 to 54 years of age.

The vast majority (95%) of patients who underwent THA were 45 years of age or older. Among this population, the quantity of THA procedures performed increased from 138,700 in 2000 to 310,800 in 2010. In all age groups 45 years of age and older, increases in the incidence of THA were observed.

Of all THA procedures performed, increases in the number of procedures performed from 2000 to 2010 were seen among the 45- to 54-year-old group (12% to 17%) and the 55- to 64-year-old group (24% to 29%), whereas decreases were seen in patients 65 to 74 years (34% to 28%) and 75 years of age or more (30% to 26%). Despite being lower than those of older patients, the rate of THAs per 100,000 people 45 to 54 years of age increased from 45 procedures in 2000 to 117 procedures in 2010, according to the researchers.
Average length of hospital stay for all patients 45 years of age and older who underwent THA decreased by approximately 1 day from 2000 to 2010. The lowest average hospital stay by age range was 3 days in the 45- to 54-year-old group, whereas the highest average hospital stay was 4 days in the 75 years and older age group. – by Christian Ingram

Reference: Wolford ML, et al. NCHS Data Brief, No. 186. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2015.

Recently published data show the quantity of total hip arthroplasty procedures performed in 2010 represent a significant increase from the number performed in 2000.

According to the National Hospital Discharge Survey, 326,100 patients underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) in 2010 — an increase from approximately 142,000 in 2000. The increase in THA procedures ranged from 92% among patients 75 years of age and older to 205% in those from 45 to 54 years of age.

The vast majority (95%) of patients who underwent THA were 45 years of age or older. Among this population, the quantity of THA procedures performed increased from 138,700 in 2000 to 310,800 in 2010. In all age groups 45 years of age and older, increases in the incidence of THA were observed.

Of all THA procedures performed, increases in the number of procedures performed from 2000 to 2010 were seen among the 45- to 54-year-old group (12% to 17%) and the 55- to 64-year-old group (24% to 29%), whereas decreases were seen in patients 65 to 74 years (34% to 28%) and 75 years of age or more (30% to 26%). Despite being lower than those of older patients, the rate of THAs per 100,000 people 45 to 54 years of age increased from 45 procedures in 2000 to 117 procedures in 2010, according to the researchers.
Average length of hospital stay for all patients 45 years of age and older who underwent THA decreased by approximately 1 day from 2000 to 2010. The lowest average hospital stay by age range was 3 days in the 45- to 54-year-old group, whereas the highest average hospital stay was 4 days in the 75 years and older age group. – by Christian Ingram

Reference: Wolford ML, et al. NCHS Data Brief, No. 186. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2015.

    Perspective
    Robert Molloy

    Robert Molloy

    The numbers just released from the CDC confirm what had been predicted by Kurtz and colleagues. If the predictions continue to hold, we are reaching an era where we will see an exponential increase in the number of total hips and knees performed in the United States.

    The greatest increase in procedures performed over this time period was in the younger age groups – 45 years to 54 years and 55 years to 64 years. In the 45 years to 54 years age range, a 200% increase was realized.  

    Patients and physicians have more confidence in the longevity of implants we are using today, and this gives them greater comfort to perform these operations. In addition, patients today are less tolerant of the sedentary lifestyle that advanced stages of osteoarthritis require. Many patients continue to live an active lifestyle well into their 70s and 80s.

    What is incumbent upon us as an orthopedic community is to monitor our outcomes, both short-term and long-term, to ensure we are providing the pain relief, function and long-term survivorship that these younger patients require.

    • Robert Molloy, MD
    • Director, Center for Adult Reconstruction Cleveland Clinic Cleveland

    Disclosures: Molloy reports no relevant financial disclosures.