Meeting News

Early protected movement of Boxer’s fractures yielded improved outcomes vs splinting

Helene Retrouvey

LAS VEGAS — Early protected movement improved functional outcomes compared with immobilization and splinting in patients with Boxer’s fractures, according to results presented at the American Society for Surgery of the Hand Annual Meeting.

Helene Retrouvey, MD , PhD , and colleagues randomly assigned 37 patients with Boxer’s fractures to be treated with either a tensor bandage (n=16) or a splint (n=21) for 4 weeks. Main outcome measures included the Brief Michigan Hand Questionnaire and grip strength measurement recorded at baseline and at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after treatment, according to Retrouvey.

In her presentation, Retrouvey noted patients were usually men around the age of 35 years with permanent employment.

“In terms of our outcomes with Brief Michigan Hand Questionnaires, at any time point, there were no differences in groups, indicating that patients were perceiving that they were doing well in both groups,” Retrouvey said.

At 8 weeks, patients in the tensor bandage group had better grip strength, according to Retrouvey. However, she noted that grip strength was similar between the two groups at 12 weeks.

“From the patient perspective, there is no difference in hand function based on the interventions that we gave,” Retrouvey said. “Again, looking at grip strength at 8 weeks, there was a bit of a faster recovery for the patients who have early movement as compared to splinting.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Retrouvey H, et al. Abstract 69. Presented at: American Society for Surgery of the Hand Annual Meeting; Sept. 5-7, 2019; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Retrouvey reports no relevant financial disclosures.

Helene Retrouvey

LAS VEGAS — Early protected movement improved functional outcomes compared with immobilization and splinting in patients with Boxer’s fractures, according to results presented at the American Society for Surgery of the Hand Annual Meeting.

Helene Retrouvey, MD , PhD , and colleagues randomly assigned 37 patients with Boxer’s fractures to be treated with either a tensor bandage (n=16) or a splint (n=21) for 4 weeks. Main outcome measures included the Brief Michigan Hand Questionnaire and grip strength measurement recorded at baseline and at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after treatment, according to Retrouvey.

In her presentation, Retrouvey noted patients were usually men around the age of 35 years with permanent employment.

“In terms of our outcomes with Brief Michigan Hand Questionnaires, at any time point, there were no differences in groups, indicating that patients were perceiving that they were doing well in both groups,” Retrouvey said.

At 8 weeks, patients in the tensor bandage group had better grip strength, according to Retrouvey. However, she noted that grip strength was similar between the two groups at 12 weeks.

“From the patient perspective, there is no difference in hand function based on the interventions that we gave,” Retrouvey said. “Again, looking at grip strength at 8 weeks, there was a bit of a faster recovery for the patients who have early movement as compared to splinting.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Retrouvey H, et al. Abstract 69. Presented at: American Society for Surgery of the Hand Annual Meeting; Sept. 5-7, 2019; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Retrouvey reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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