In the Journals

Trimed dynamic compression plate shows improvements in radiographic ulnar variance

Patients who underwent ulnar shortening with the Trimed dynamic compression plate experienced consistent objective improvements in radiographic ulnar variance, according to study results.

Researchers obtained radiographic analysis preoperatively and at an average 24-month follow-up for 27 patients who underwent ulnar shortening using the Trimed dynamic compression plate. The DASH inventory, Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) and VAS for pain were completed by a subset of 12 patients. The subset also underwent clinical evaluation for range of motion and strength.

Results showed, between pre- and postoperative imaging, ulnar variance improved in all cases.

The researchers found the contralateral extremity had a grip strength of 79% and range of motion of 90%. Additionally, DASH and PRWE scores were significantly different among patients involved in a worker’s compensation claim, according to study results.

Patients involved in a worker’s compensation claim also showed a trend toward nonunion.

The researchers concluded that the potential negative influence workers’ compensation claims can have on outcomes of ulnar shortening should be considered during patient selection and preoperative counseling. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Patients who underwent ulnar shortening with the Trimed dynamic compression plate experienced consistent objective improvements in radiographic ulnar variance, according to study results.

Researchers obtained radiographic analysis preoperatively and at an average 24-month follow-up for 27 patients who underwent ulnar shortening using the Trimed dynamic compression plate. The DASH inventory, Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) and VAS for pain were completed by a subset of 12 patients. The subset also underwent clinical evaluation for range of motion and strength.

Results showed, between pre- and postoperative imaging, ulnar variance improved in all cases.

The researchers found the contralateral extremity had a grip strength of 79% and range of motion of 90%. Additionally, DASH and PRWE scores were significantly different among patients involved in a worker’s compensation claim, according to study results.

Patients involved in a worker’s compensation claim also showed a trend toward nonunion.

The researchers concluded that the potential negative influence workers’ compensation claims can have on outcomes of ulnar shortening should be considered during patient selection and preoperative counseling. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.