In the Journals

Similar surgical results in finger flexion contracture seen in smokers, patients with diabetes

Although smokers had more severe preoperative contractures, results of this study showed no significant differences in surgical outcomes for finger flexion contracture in patients with Dupuytren’s disease who were smokers or non-smokers or between patients with or without diabetes.

Researchers studied the outcome of open surgical treatment for finger flexion contractures in 175 patients with Dupuytren’s disease by evaluating valid QuickDASH forms answered by participants before surgery and 1 year postoperatively. Researchers also obtained data from medical records and preoperative declarations concerning health.

Results showed an improvement in the QuickDASH score from 22 to five points. Compared with non-smokers, smokers were younger and had a more severe degree of disease and dysfunction preoperatively; however, the outcome of surgery did not differ between the groups. Similarly, researchers found participants with diabetes were younger vs. participants without diabetes, but the surgical outcome did not differ. Neither smokers nor patients with diabetes experienced frequent occurrences of necrosis of skin flaps or infections. According to the results, health care costs for surgery for Dupuytren’s contracture was not higher among smokers or participants with diabetes. Overall, 22 patients remained in hospitals and 28 patients needed sick leave.

Disclosures: Dahlin has been a member of the advisory board for Pfizer Inc. and Auxilium Inc. and has been a primary investigator in three clinical trials of Xiapex in Sweden.

Although smokers had more severe preoperative contractures, results of this study showed no significant differences in surgical outcomes for finger flexion contracture in patients with Dupuytren’s disease who were smokers or non-smokers or between patients with or without diabetes.

Researchers studied the outcome of open surgical treatment for finger flexion contractures in 175 patients with Dupuytren’s disease by evaluating valid QuickDASH forms answered by participants before surgery and 1 year postoperatively. Researchers also obtained data from medical records and preoperative declarations concerning health.

Results showed an improvement in the QuickDASH score from 22 to five points. Compared with non-smokers, smokers were younger and had a more severe degree of disease and dysfunction preoperatively; however, the outcome of surgery did not differ between the groups. Similarly, researchers found participants with diabetes were younger vs. participants without diabetes, but the surgical outcome did not differ. Neither smokers nor patients with diabetes experienced frequent occurrences of necrosis of skin flaps or infections. According to the results, health care costs for surgery for Dupuytren’s contracture was not higher among smokers or participants with diabetes. Overall, 22 patients remained in hospitals and 28 patients needed sick leave.

Disclosures: Dahlin has been a member of the advisory board for Pfizer Inc. and Auxilium Inc. and has been a primary investigator in three clinical trials of Xiapex in Sweden.