In the Journals

Tibialis anterior tendon transfer may prevent deformity relapse in idiopathic clubfoot

Tibialis anterior tendon transfer prevented additional relapse of deformity in patients with idiopathic clubfoot without affecting long-term foot function, according to study results.

Researchers obtained follow-up data for 35 patients with idiopathic clubfoot treated with the Ponseti method from 1950 to 1967. Fourteen patients underwent tibialis anterior tendon transfer for clubfoot relapse during childhood and served as the study group, whereas 21 patients did not undergo a tibialis anterior tendon transfer and served as the reference group. Patients underwent a detailed musculoskeletal examination, radiographic evaluation, pedobarographic analysis and surface electromyography (EMG), and completed three quality-of-life patient questionnaires.

Results showed no subsequent relapse or need for additional operative intervention associated with clubfoot deformity in either group.

Although mean ankle dorsiflexion was similar between the groups, the researchers found patients who underwent tendon transfer had a smaller mean anteroposterior talocalcaneal angle and slightly more talar flattening vs. the reference group with no associated clinical differences.

No significant difference was found in peak pressures, total force distribution or surface EMG results between the groups, nor were any significant differences observed in outcome questionnaires, according to the researchers.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.

Tibialis anterior tendon transfer prevented additional relapse of deformity in patients with idiopathic clubfoot without affecting long-term foot function, according to study results.

Researchers obtained follow-up data for 35 patients with idiopathic clubfoot treated with the Ponseti method from 1950 to 1967. Fourteen patients underwent tibialis anterior tendon transfer for clubfoot relapse during childhood and served as the study group, whereas 21 patients did not undergo a tibialis anterior tendon transfer and served as the reference group. Patients underwent a detailed musculoskeletal examination, radiographic evaluation, pedobarographic analysis and surface electromyography (EMG), and completed three quality-of-life patient questionnaires.

Results showed no subsequent relapse or need for additional operative intervention associated with clubfoot deformity in either group.

Although mean ankle dorsiflexion was similar between the groups, the researchers found patients who underwent tendon transfer had a smaller mean anteroposterior talocalcaneal angle and slightly more talar flattening vs. the reference group with no associated clinical differences.

No significant difference was found in peak pressures, total force distribution or surface EMG results between the groups, nor were any significant differences observed in outcome questionnaires, according to the researchers.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.