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Study highlights factors linked with persistent opioid use after treatment of hallux valgus

BOSTON — Researchers found patient factors correlated with new, persistent opioid use in patients who underwent surgical treatment for hallux valgus.

Fred Finney, MD, headshot
Fred Finney

Fred Finney , MD, presented the findings at the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society Annual Meeting. Finney and colleagues used an insurance claims dataset to identify 38,312 opioid-naïve patients who underwent surgical treatment of the hallux valgus with a distal or proximal first metatarsal osteotomy. New, persistent opioid use was calculated. Patient factors such as surgery type, health insurance type, age, gender household income and comorbidities were evaluated to determine if these were predictors for new, persistent opioid use.

“Timing of the prescription mattered in this group,” he said. “Those who refilled a preoperative prescription again in that 30 days prior to surgery were significantly more likely to continue using after 3 months. Additionally, the strongest modifiable risk factor was the initial dose they were given.”

Results showed the rate of new, persistent opioid use among all patients was 6.2%. Investigators found 90% of patients underwent distal metatarsal osteotomy. New, persistent opioid use was seen more in patients treated with a proximal metatarsal osteotomy.

According to results of logistic regression, depression, anxiety, alcohol and substance abuse disorders and certain pain disorders were among the patient factors that independently correlated with new, persistent opioid use. Factors not correlated with new, persistent opioid use included age, gender and income.

“New, persistent opioid use ranges from 6% to 7% among opioid-naïve patients undergoing elective bunion surgery, which makes this one of the most common complications in hallux valgus correction,” Finney said. – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Reference:

Finney F, et al. New, persistent opioid use following common forefoot procedures for treatment of hallux valgus. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society Annual Meeting; July 11-14, 2018; Boston.

 

Disclosure: Finney reports no relevant financial disclosures.

BOSTON — Researchers found patient factors correlated with new, persistent opioid use in patients who underwent surgical treatment for hallux valgus.

Fred Finney, MD, headshot
Fred Finney

Fred Finney , MD, presented the findings at the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society Annual Meeting. Finney and colleagues used an insurance claims dataset to identify 38,312 opioid-naïve patients who underwent surgical treatment of the hallux valgus with a distal or proximal first metatarsal osteotomy. New, persistent opioid use was calculated. Patient factors such as surgery type, health insurance type, age, gender household income and comorbidities were evaluated to determine if these were predictors for new, persistent opioid use.

“Timing of the prescription mattered in this group,” he said. “Those who refilled a preoperative prescription again in that 30 days prior to surgery were significantly more likely to continue using after 3 months. Additionally, the strongest modifiable risk factor was the initial dose they were given.”

Results showed the rate of new, persistent opioid use among all patients was 6.2%. Investigators found 90% of patients underwent distal metatarsal osteotomy. New, persistent opioid use was seen more in patients treated with a proximal metatarsal osteotomy.

According to results of logistic regression, depression, anxiety, alcohol and substance abuse disorders and certain pain disorders were among the patient factors that independently correlated with new, persistent opioid use. Factors not correlated with new, persistent opioid use included age, gender and income.

“New, persistent opioid use ranges from 6% to 7% among opioid-naïve patients undergoing elective bunion surgery, which makes this one of the most common complications in hallux valgus correction,” Finney said. – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Reference:

Finney F, et al. New, persistent opioid use following common forefoot procedures for treatment of hallux valgus. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society Annual Meeting; July 11-14, 2018; Boston.

 

Disclosure: Finney reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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