Meeting News Coverage

Patients with chronic foot and ankle pain found more depressed, anxious than healthy patients

HOLLYWOOD, Fla. — Patients with chronic foot and ankle pain had higher neurotic, anxiety and depression scores than healthy patients, according to a study presented here at the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Annual Meeting.

“We are slowly realizing that there may be an influence of psychological factors in the management of chronic foot and ankle pain,” Simon R. Platt, MBChB, FRCS, said. “We did find some easy to use psychometric tools which may be adjunctive to the management and scoring of postoperative results from surgery.”

Simon R. Platt, MBChB, FRCS 

Simon R. Platt

The researchers compared psychometric test scores of 45 patients with chronic foot and ankle pain and 45 healthy patients in a control group. Researchers excluded patients who were younger than 16 years or had previous foot or ankle disorders or chronic painful disorders. Patients completed questionnaires, including the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQ-R), the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale.

The researchers found higher overall neuroticism and anxiety and depression scores in patients with chronic foot and ankle pain when compared to the control group, according to Platt. For the HAD scale, anxiety scores were 6.93 in the patient group and 2.33 in the control group. Depression scores were 6.69 in the patient group and 3.66 in the control group. For the EPQ-R, there were higher levels of neuroticism in the patient group than in the control group. DAS scores were nonsignificant, Platt said.

“You may need to involve a multidisciplinary approach around the psychological and psychometric aspects of pain and we need further research to look at how pain scores and outcome scores are affected by personality and outcome scores,” Platt said.

Reference:

Platt. Paper #8. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Annual Meeting; July 18-20, 2013; Hollywood, Fla.

Disclosure: Platt has no relevant financial disclosures.

HOLLYWOOD, Fla. — Patients with chronic foot and ankle pain had higher neurotic, anxiety and depression scores than healthy patients, according to a study presented here at the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Annual Meeting.

“We are slowly realizing that there may be an influence of psychological factors in the management of chronic foot and ankle pain,” Simon R. Platt, MBChB, FRCS, said. “We did find some easy to use psychometric tools which may be adjunctive to the management and scoring of postoperative results from surgery.”

Simon R. Platt, MBChB, FRCS 

Simon R. Platt

The researchers compared psychometric test scores of 45 patients with chronic foot and ankle pain and 45 healthy patients in a control group. Researchers excluded patients who were younger than 16 years or had previous foot or ankle disorders or chronic painful disorders. Patients completed questionnaires, including the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQ-R), the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale.

The researchers found higher overall neuroticism and anxiety and depression scores in patients with chronic foot and ankle pain when compared to the control group, according to Platt. For the HAD scale, anxiety scores were 6.93 in the patient group and 2.33 in the control group. Depression scores were 6.69 in the patient group and 3.66 in the control group. For the EPQ-R, there were higher levels of neuroticism in the patient group than in the control group. DAS scores were nonsignificant, Platt said.

“You may need to involve a multidisciplinary approach around the psychological and psychometric aspects of pain and we need further research to look at how pain scores and outcome scores are affected by personality and outcome scores,” Platt said.

Reference:

Platt. Paper #8. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Annual Meeting; July 18-20, 2013; Hollywood, Fla.

Disclosure: Platt has no relevant financial disclosures.

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