Meeting News

Speaker guides surgeons through ‘mid-career blues’

Michael Daubs

LAS VEGAS — When experiencing the “mid-career blues,” orthopedic surgeons should perform a self-assessment and be sure to not immediately rush to change, according to a presenter at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

“If you are feeling this discontent, you are feeling like you want to change jobs, you want to do this, you want to do that, I tell you [that you] have to take a break. Take some time and think about it,” Michael Daubs, MD, said in his presentation here.

After taking time to evaluate and decide what is missing, he said surgeons should not be afraid to make small or large changes.

“Try not to be impulsive about this,” Daubs said. “Be true to yourself, and I think you will find the answer and you will end up being happier.”

Daubs noted to stay engaged with family and friends and to avoid unhealthy paths, such as substance abuse and overworking. He also said to consider new hobbies or go back to old hobbies.

“Art, sculpting, acting, painting, all those things that we all put away while we were being technicians and thinking about science,” Daubs said. “I think those will lead to more happiness than diving further, deeper into your career and working more.”

Surgeons can also consider changes in career, whether that means obtaining another degree or taking on a new role in the hospital or committee, or taking a sabbatical, according to Daubs. He added visiting colleagues can also be beneficial and valuable. – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Daubs M. Lifelong learning and how. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 12-15, 2019; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Daubs reports he has no relevant financial disclosures.

Michael Daubs

LAS VEGAS — When experiencing the “mid-career blues,” orthopedic surgeons should perform a self-assessment and be sure to not immediately rush to change, according to a presenter at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

“If you are feeling this discontent, you are feeling like you want to change jobs, you want to do this, you want to do that, I tell you [that you] have to take a break. Take some time and think about it,” Michael Daubs, MD, said in his presentation here.

After taking time to evaluate and decide what is missing, he said surgeons should not be afraid to make small or large changes.

“Try not to be impulsive about this,” Daubs said. “Be true to yourself, and I think you will find the answer and you will end up being happier.”

Daubs noted to stay engaged with family and friends and to avoid unhealthy paths, such as substance abuse and overworking. He also said to consider new hobbies or go back to old hobbies.

“Art, sculpting, acting, painting, all those things that we all put away while we were being technicians and thinking about science,” Daubs said. “I think those will lead to more happiness than diving further, deeper into your career and working more.”

Surgeons can also consider changes in career, whether that means obtaining another degree or taking on a new role in the hospital or committee, or taking a sabbatical, according to Daubs. He added visiting colleagues can also be beneficial and valuable. – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Daubs M. Lifelong learning and how. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 12-15, 2019; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Daubs reports he has no relevant financial disclosures.

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