American Joint Replacement Registry releases annual report on hip, knee arthroplasty

At the 2015 American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Annual Meeting, the American Joint Replacement Registry announced the release of its 2014 Annual Report on hip and knee arthroplasty data.

Containing data from 236 institutions representing 45 states, the Annual Report includes procedural findings and component metrics, as well as recent American Joint Replacement Registry (AJRR) accomplishments, such as the launch of a pilot program to collect level 2 data, according to a press release from the AJRR. The AJRR will improve data capture on comorbidities and complications collected from level 2 patient information and have consistent reporting and clearly defined data element definitions in the future, the release noted.

“The number of procedures in the registry grew by 164% since our first formal report last year,” Daniel J. Berry, MD, chair of the AJRR board of directors, stated in a press release. “Our first report covered 80,227 procedures, and this one covers the collection and analysis of 211,721 procedures related to hip and knee replacements that have taken place from when we began collecting data up until December 2014.”

The press release also noted a separate California Joint Replacement Registry Annual Report was released which addresses the scientific assessment of devices, treatment protocols, surgical approaches and patient factors that influence the results of hip and knee replacement surgery in that state.

“With the continued support of the diverse stakeholders in the orthopedic community, AJRR will keep on growing and will reach its goal of collecting over 90% of all hip and knee replacement procedures performed in the U.S.,” Berry stated in the release. “We are thankful to the hospitals and surgeons who recognize the importance of a registry by entering their surgical data into the AJRR. We will continue our diligence in building a valuable national hip and knee arthroplasty registry that has a positive impact on patient care and the quality and durability of joint replacement surgery in the United States.” – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

www.ajrr.net.

At the 2015 American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Annual Meeting, the American Joint Replacement Registry announced the release of its 2014 Annual Report on hip and knee arthroplasty data.

Containing data from 236 institutions representing 45 states, the Annual Report includes procedural findings and component metrics, as well as recent American Joint Replacement Registry (AJRR) accomplishments, such as the launch of a pilot program to collect level 2 data, according to a press release from the AJRR. The AJRR will improve data capture on comorbidities and complications collected from level 2 patient information and have consistent reporting and clearly defined data element definitions in the future, the release noted.

“The number of procedures in the registry grew by 164% since our first formal report last year,” Daniel J. Berry, MD, chair of the AJRR board of directors, stated in a press release. “Our first report covered 80,227 procedures, and this one covers the collection and analysis of 211,721 procedures related to hip and knee replacements that have taken place from when we began collecting data up until December 2014.”

The press release also noted a separate California Joint Replacement Registry Annual Report was released which addresses the scientific assessment of devices, treatment protocols, surgical approaches and patient factors that influence the results of hip and knee replacement surgery in that state.

“With the continued support of the diverse stakeholders in the orthopedic community, AJRR will keep on growing and will reach its goal of collecting over 90% of all hip and knee replacement procedures performed in the U.S.,” Berry stated in the release. “We are thankful to the hospitals and surgeons who recognize the importance of a registry by entering their surgical data into the AJRR. We will continue our diligence in building a valuable national hip and knee arthroplasty registry that has a positive impact on patient care and the quality and durability of joint replacement surgery in the United States.” – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

www.ajrr.net.