Meeting News

Most negative online reviews involve nonclinical concerns

Jaymeson Arthur

LAS VEGAS — Results presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting showed most negative online reviews of surgeons who perform total joint arthroplasty were nonclinical concerns posted by patients who did not report undergoing prior total joint surgery by the surgeon or practice being reviewed.

“While certainly it is important for us to pay attention to the conventional quality metrics that we are familiar with in today’s health care landscape, be aware of your online presence and factors that most commonly lead to a negative patient experience,” Jaymeson Arthur, MD, said in his presentation here. “Being aware of this may help you present yourself in the best light in the future.”

Arthur and colleagues reviewed single-star reviews for total knee and total hip replacements reported on a review website for eight major metropolitan areas. A secondary search was performed to verify that the surgeon or practice did perform total joint replacements, Arthur said.

“In the end, we had a total of 320 single-star reviews that we used for analysis,” Arthur said. “Based on those single-star reviews, we went through each of them individually and stratified them to either clinical or nonclinical complaints.”

Arthur noted they also stratified the comments into either surgical or nonsurgical cohorts based on whether patients reported surgery in their comments.

“Looking at the data, ... the nonclinical reviews were nearly three times as common as the clinical reviews,” he said. “A small number of patient reviews contained both nonclinical and clinical reasons for a negative review.”

He added 25% of patients reported having surgery. Uncontrolled pain was the most commonly reported clinical factor, according to Arthur, while physician bedside manner, wait times and not enough time spent with providers were the most common nonclinical complaints.

“The nonsurgical patients were three-times more likely than surgical patients to give a negative review for factors, like not enough time spent with a provider, wait times and scheduling issues,” Arthur said. “Then, as one might suspect, it was the nonsurgical patients who were more likely to leave negative reviews for nonclinical factors and it was the surgical patients who were going to leave negative reviews for clinical issues.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Arthur J, et al. Abstract 568. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 12-16, 2019; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Arthur reports no relevant financial disclosures.

Jaymeson Arthur

LAS VEGAS — Results presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting showed most negative online reviews of surgeons who perform total joint arthroplasty were nonclinical concerns posted by patients who did not report undergoing prior total joint surgery by the surgeon or practice being reviewed.

“While certainly it is important for us to pay attention to the conventional quality metrics that we are familiar with in today’s health care landscape, be aware of your online presence and factors that most commonly lead to a negative patient experience,” Jaymeson Arthur, MD, said in his presentation here. “Being aware of this may help you present yourself in the best light in the future.”

Arthur and colleagues reviewed single-star reviews for total knee and total hip replacements reported on a review website for eight major metropolitan areas. A secondary search was performed to verify that the surgeon or practice did perform total joint replacements, Arthur said.

“In the end, we had a total of 320 single-star reviews that we used for analysis,” Arthur said. “Based on those single-star reviews, we went through each of them individually and stratified them to either clinical or nonclinical complaints.”

Arthur noted they also stratified the comments into either surgical or nonsurgical cohorts based on whether patients reported surgery in their comments.

“Looking at the data, ... the nonclinical reviews were nearly three times as common as the clinical reviews,” he said. “A small number of patient reviews contained both nonclinical and clinical reasons for a negative review.”

He added 25% of patients reported having surgery. Uncontrolled pain was the most commonly reported clinical factor, according to Arthur, while physician bedside manner, wait times and not enough time spent with providers were the most common nonclinical complaints.

“The nonsurgical patients were three-times more likely than surgical patients to give a negative review for factors, like not enough time spent with a provider, wait times and scheduling issues,” Arthur said. “Then, as one might suspect, it was the nonsurgical patients who were more likely to leave negative reviews for nonclinical factors and it was the surgical patients who were going to leave negative reviews for clinical issues.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Arthur J, et al. Abstract 568. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 12-16, 2019; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Arthur reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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