Meeting News Coverage

No significant association likely between preoperative antibiotics and deep, superficial infection

LOS ANGELES — No statistically significant association was found between preoperative antibiotic use and either deep or superficial infection after knee arthroscopy, according to results presented at the Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting.

“In this retrospective study of a large number of patients undergoing simple knee arthroscopy, there was no statistically significant association between giving a preoperative antibiotic and the postoperative infection rate,” Ronald Wyatt, MD, said during his presentation.

Wyatt and colleagues reviewed electronic medical records and identified 40,810 patients who underwent simple knee arthroscopy, including debridement, synovectomy, meniscectomy, meniscus repair and lateral release, between 2007 and 2012. The researchers extracted patient demographics, potential infection risk factors and prophylactic antibiotic administration data.

Overall, 35,518 patients received preoperative antibiotics and 8,604 did not. Wyatt noted patients who received preoperative antibiotics had a deep infection rate of 0.084% and a superficial infection rate of 0.44%, whereas patients who did not receive antibiotics had a deep infection rate of 0.14% and a superficial infection rate of 0.40%.

“For patients who developed a deep infection, coagulase staph was the most common effective organism, followed by [Staphylococcus] aureus and MRSA [methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus],” Wyatt said.

Logistic regression analysis showed increased patient age was a risk factor for overall infection and superficial infection. – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

Wyatt R, et al. Paper #SS-22. Presented at: Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting. April 23-25, 2015; Los Angeles.

Disclosure: Wyatt reports no relevant financial disclosures.

LOS ANGELES — No statistically significant association was found between preoperative antibiotic use and either deep or superficial infection after knee arthroscopy, according to results presented at the Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting.

“In this retrospective study of a large number of patients undergoing simple knee arthroscopy, there was no statistically significant association between giving a preoperative antibiotic and the postoperative infection rate,” Ronald Wyatt, MD, said during his presentation.

Wyatt and colleagues reviewed electronic medical records and identified 40,810 patients who underwent simple knee arthroscopy, including debridement, synovectomy, meniscectomy, meniscus repair and lateral release, between 2007 and 2012. The researchers extracted patient demographics, potential infection risk factors and prophylactic antibiotic administration data.

Overall, 35,518 patients received preoperative antibiotics and 8,604 did not. Wyatt noted patients who received preoperative antibiotics had a deep infection rate of 0.084% and a superficial infection rate of 0.44%, whereas patients who did not receive antibiotics had a deep infection rate of 0.14% and a superficial infection rate of 0.40%.

“For patients who developed a deep infection, coagulase staph was the most common effective organism, followed by [Staphylococcus] aureus and MRSA [methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus],” Wyatt said.

Logistic regression analysis showed increased patient age was a risk factor for overall infection and superficial infection. – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

Wyatt R, et al. Paper #SS-22. Presented at: Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting. April 23-25, 2015; Los Angeles.

Disclosure: Wyatt reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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