In the Journals

Immediate, delayed surgery for rotator cuff tears with stiffness offer satisfactory results

Patients with rotator cuff tears with stiffness achieved satisfactory results through repair utilizing simultaneous capsular release or by waiting to perform the repair after preoperative rehabilitation for stiffness, according to study results.

Researchers assigned 63 patients with rotator cuff tears and stiffness to undergo arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with simultaneous capsular release (group I) or arthroscopic rotator cuff repair after 6 months of preoperative rehabilitation for stiffness (group II). The researchers assessed the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Simple Shoulder Test score, Constant score, and VAS score for pain and range of motion (ROM) at the start of the study; at 3, 6 and 12 months; and at the final visit. Using MRI or ultrasound images, the researchers also assessed postoperative cuff tendon integrity between 6 months and 12 months.

No significant differences in preoperative demographic data between the groups were reported. After a mean follow-up period of 21.54 months, results showed significant improvement in ROM and functional scores in both groups at last follow-up, according to the researchers. Additionally, no statistically significant differences were observed in clinical scores and ROM at final follow-up.

Hyo-Jin Lee

Assessment of MRI or ultrasound images taken 6 to 12 months postoperatively showed a re-tear rate for the repaired cuff tendon of 12.1% in group I vs. 13.4% in group II.

Because outcomes were similar between the two approaches, the researchers recommended earlier treatment using simultaneous capsular repair so as to avoid unnecessary rehabilitation. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Patients with rotator cuff tears with stiffness achieved satisfactory results through repair utilizing simultaneous capsular release or by waiting to perform the repair after preoperative rehabilitation for stiffness, according to study results.

Researchers assigned 63 patients with rotator cuff tears and stiffness to undergo arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with simultaneous capsular release (group I) or arthroscopic rotator cuff repair after 6 months of preoperative rehabilitation for stiffness (group II). The researchers assessed the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Simple Shoulder Test score, Constant score, and VAS score for pain and range of motion (ROM) at the start of the study; at 3, 6 and 12 months; and at the final visit. Using MRI or ultrasound images, the researchers also assessed postoperative cuff tendon integrity between 6 months and 12 months.

No significant differences in preoperative demographic data between the groups were reported. After a mean follow-up period of 21.54 months, results showed significant improvement in ROM and functional scores in both groups at last follow-up, according to the researchers. Additionally, no statistically significant differences were observed in clinical scores and ROM at final follow-up.

Hyo-Jin Lee

Assessment of MRI or ultrasound images taken 6 to 12 months postoperatively showed a re-tear rate for the repaired cuff tendon of 12.1% in group I vs. 13.4% in group II.

Because outcomes were similar between the two approaches, the researchers recommended earlier treatment using simultaneous capsular repair so as to avoid unnecessary rehabilitation. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.