In the Journals

Several patient factors linked to increased risk of abnormal anterior knee laxity after ACL reconstruction

Published results showed several patient factors were associated with an increased risk of abnormal anterior knee laxity 6 months after primary ACL reconstruction.

Researchers reviewed demographic data, information regarding the graft used, concomitant meniscal surgery and instrumented laxity for 5,462 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction with no associated ligament injuries from January 2000 to October 2015. Researchers used the KT-1000 arthrometer to evaluate knee laxity preoperatively and at 6-month follow-up. Abnormal anterior knee laxity was defined as a postoperative side-to-side difference of greater than 5 mm. Researchers evaluated whether patient age, gender, preoperative knee laxity, graft type and presence of medial or lateral meniscus resection or suture were risk factors for abnormal knee laxity with logistic regression analysis.

Results showed age younger than 30 years, a preoperative side-to-side difference of greater than 5 mm, hamstring tendon graft and medial meniscus resection were significantly associated with the risk of having abnormal anterior knee laxity. However, researchers noted no association of increased risk of abnormal knee laxity with female gender, medial meniscus suture, lateral meniscus resection or lateral meniscus suture. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: Cristiani reports he receives grants from Capio Research Foundation and Sophiahemmet Hospital Research Foundation. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Published results showed several patient factors were associated with an increased risk of abnormal anterior knee laxity 6 months after primary ACL reconstruction.

Researchers reviewed demographic data, information regarding the graft used, concomitant meniscal surgery and instrumented laxity for 5,462 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction with no associated ligament injuries from January 2000 to October 2015. Researchers used the KT-1000 arthrometer to evaluate knee laxity preoperatively and at 6-month follow-up. Abnormal anterior knee laxity was defined as a postoperative side-to-side difference of greater than 5 mm. Researchers evaluated whether patient age, gender, preoperative knee laxity, graft type and presence of medial or lateral meniscus resection or suture were risk factors for abnormal knee laxity with logistic regression analysis.

Results showed age younger than 30 years, a preoperative side-to-side difference of greater than 5 mm, hamstring tendon graft and medial meniscus resection were significantly associated with the risk of having abnormal anterior knee laxity. However, researchers noted no association of increased risk of abnormal knee laxity with female gender, medial meniscus suture, lateral meniscus resection or lateral meniscus suture. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: Cristiani reports he receives grants from Capio Research Foundation and Sophiahemmet Hospital Research Foundation. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.