Meeting News

Hip arthroscopy alone or combined with PAO improved PROs for acetabular dysplasia

CHICAGO — Results presented at the Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting showed both hip arthroscopy when performed alone or in combination with periacetabular osteotomy yielded significant improvements for acetabular dysplasia in all patient-reported outcomes at 1-year and 2-year follow-ups.

Raymond J. Kenney

Raymond J. Kenney, MD, and colleagues compared modified Harris hip score, hip outcome score for activities of daily living and sports subscales, non-arthritic hip score and VAS for pain among patients with acetabular dysplasia who underwent isolated hip arthroscopy (n=90) and patients who underwent hip arthroscopy combined with periacetabular osteotomy (n=34). Researchers also administered questionnaires to all patients preoperatively and postoperatively at 3 months, 1 year and 2 years.

“The average follow-up in the scope/[periacetabular osteotomy] PAO group was 1.8 years and the hip arthroscopy alone group was an average follow-up of 3.4 years,” Kenney said in his presentation.

Results showed a significant difference in the male population, with 15% undergoing the combined procedure vs. 36% who underwent hip arthroscopy alone. Kenney noted significant differences between the groups in terms of modified Harris hip scores preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. However, both groups had statistically similar modified Harris hip scores at 1-year and 2-year follow-ups, he said.

“For the hip outcome score [activities of daily living] ADL subscale, similar patterns were noted, and in the sports scale ... at 3 months follow-up for the scope/PAO patients were significantly lower,” Kenney said.

Kenney added the groups had similar patterns in non-arthritic hip scores, as well as similar scores in the VAS for pain until 2-year follow-up when the combined procedure group had improved pain scores vs. hip arthroscopy alone. – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Kenney RJ, et al. Paper 34. Presented at: Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting; April 26-28, 2018; Chicago.

 

Disclosure: Kenney reports no relevant financial disclosures.

CHICAGO — Results presented at the Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting showed both hip arthroscopy when performed alone or in combination with periacetabular osteotomy yielded significant improvements for acetabular dysplasia in all patient-reported outcomes at 1-year and 2-year follow-ups.

Raymond J. Kenney

Raymond J. Kenney, MD, and colleagues compared modified Harris hip score, hip outcome score for activities of daily living and sports subscales, non-arthritic hip score and VAS for pain among patients with acetabular dysplasia who underwent isolated hip arthroscopy (n=90) and patients who underwent hip arthroscopy combined with periacetabular osteotomy (n=34). Researchers also administered questionnaires to all patients preoperatively and postoperatively at 3 months, 1 year and 2 years.

“The average follow-up in the scope/[periacetabular osteotomy] PAO group was 1.8 years and the hip arthroscopy alone group was an average follow-up of 3.4 years,” Kenney said in his presentation.

Results showed a significant difference in the male population, with 15% undergoing the combined procedure vs. 36% who underwent hip arthroscopy alone. Kenney noted significant differences between the groups in terms of modified Harris hip scores preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. However, both groups had statistically similar modified Harris hip scores at 1-year and 2-year follow-ups, he said.

“For the hip outcome score [activities of daily living] ADL subscale, similar patterns were noted, and in the sports scale ... at 3 months follow-up for the scope/PAO patients were significantly lower,” Kenney said.

Kenney added the groups had similar patterns in non-arthritic hip scores, as well as similar scores in the VAS for pain until 2-year follow-up when the combined procedure group had improved pain scores vs. hip arthroscopy alone. – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Kenney RJ, et al. Paper 34. Presented at: Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting; April 26-28, 2018; Chicago.

 

Disclosure: Kenney reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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