Meeting News Coverage

High isokinetic-strength, functional testing score may lead to higher knee strength, activity level

LOS ANGELES — Patients who had an excellent performance on isokinetic-strength and functional testing 6 months after ACL reconstruction exhibited superior knee strength and higher activity levels at mid-term follow-up, according to a presenter here.

“Functional and isokinetic testing at 6 months was predictive of knee function, activity level and rate of contralateral ACL injury,” Matthew Prince, DO, said at the Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting. “An early return to sport may result in higher risk for contralateral ACL injury.”

Prince and colleagues compared the rate of ipsilateral ACL graft rupture and contralateral ACL tear among 52 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction and met the criteria for the early return-to-sport group and 171 patients who met the criteria for the delayed return-to-sport group.

Matthew Prince

After a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, the researchers found 4.5% of patients had an ipsilateral graft rupture and 7.6% of patients had a contralateral ACL tear. Both the early and delayed return-to-sport groups experienced a similar graft rupture rate, according to study results.

“Overall, the graft free injury rate was low, and there was no statistical difference between either group,” Prince said.

However, Prince noted, the early return-to-sport group had a 15.4% rate of contralateral ACL tear vs. 5.3% rate in the delayed return-to-sport group. Results also showed the early return-to-sport group had superior IKDC and Tegner scores.

“For graft rupture, the only significant predictor was female gender, while for contralateral ACL injury, the only significant predictor was an early return to sport,” Prince said.

Reference:

Prince M, et al. Paper #SS-14. Presented at: Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting. April 23-25, 2015; Los Angeles.

Disclosure: Prince reports no relevant financial disclosures.

LOS ANGELES — Patients who had an excellent performance on isokinetic-strength and functional testing 6 months after ACL reconstruction exhibited superior knee strength and higher activity levels at mid-term follow-up, according to a presenter here.

“Functional and isokinetic testing at 6 months was predictive of knee function, activity level and rate of contralateral ACL injury,” Matthew Prince, DO, said at the Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting. “An early return to sport may result in higher risk for contralateral ACL injury.”

Prince and colleagues compared the rate of ipsilateral ACL graft rupture and contralateral ACL tear among 52 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction and met the criteria for the early return-to-sport group and 171 patients who met the criteria for the delayed return-to-sport group.

Matthew Prince

After a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, the researchers found 4.5% of patients had an ipsilateral graft rupture and 7.6% of patients had a contralateral ACL tear. Both the early and delayed return-to-sport groups experienced a similar graft rupture rate, according to study results.

“Overall, the graft free injury rate was low, and there was no statistical difference between either group,” Prince said.

However, Prince noted, the early return-to-sport group had a 15.4% rate of contralateral ACL tear vs. 5.3% rate in the delayed return-to-sport group. Results also showed the early return-to-sport group had superior IKDC and Tegner scores.

“For graft rupture, the only significant predictor was female gender, while for contralateral ACL injury, the only significant predictor was an early return to sport,” Prince said.

Reference:

Prince M, et al. Paper #SS-14. Presented at: Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting. April 23-25, 2015; Los Angeles.

Disclosure: Prince reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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