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VIDEO: Orthopedic surgeons may be able to prescribe fewer opioid pills than they think is necessary

LAS VEGAS — At the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting, James Gladstone, MD, chief of the orthopedic sports medicine service in the department of orthopedic surgery at the Mount Sinai Health System and associate professor of orthopedic surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, spoke about the prescribing and use practices for opioids after arthroscopic meniscectomy.

“More than likely, you can prescribe less [pills] than you think is necessary,” he said.

Gladstone said that, overall, orthopedic surgeons can reduce the number of opioids they prescribe to patients and can always re-prescribe more pills if needed.

LAS VEGAS — At the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting, James Gladstone, MD, chief of the orthopedic sports medicine service in the department of orthopedic surgery at the Mount Sinai Health System and associate professor of orthopedic surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, spoke about the prescribing and use practices for opioids after arthroscopic meniscectomy.

“More than likely, you can prescribe less [pills] than you think is necessary,” he said.

Gladstone said that, overall, orthopedic surgeons can reduce the number of opioids they prescribe to patients and can always re-prescribe more pills if needed.

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