Industry News

Smith & Nephew introduces hip impingement planning system

Smith & Nephew launched the Dyonics Plan Hip Impingement Planning System at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting in New Orleans. The 3-D software system allows surgeons to visualize, assess and generate a comprehensive surgical report for each patient’s femoroacetabular impingement surgery before the patient enters the operating room.

According to a company press release, Dyonics Plan provides a standardized and repeatable way for the assessment of hip impingement treatment options based on data from low-dose CT scans. The software, which is installed on a surgeon’s computer, also allows for interactive adjustments based on a surgeon’s clinical experience. A surgeon can perform a variety of dynamic range-of-motion simulations to identify the degree and location of hip impingement by using the 3-D model of the patient’s joint. The range of motion feature can be used to individualize a surgical plan based on a patient’s lifestyle or sports-specific motion, or to assess impact of different surgical strategies on patient outcomes. Once finalized, the system generates a comprehensive surgical plan that can be exported into either HTML or PDF format.

“Dyonics Plan offers surgeons the ability to understand and address a patient’s hip impingement on a level that goes beyond anything possible with standard imaging tools,” Brad Cannon, president of endoscopy, trauma and extremities for Smith & Nephew, stated in the release. “Because it tells a more complete story about each patient’s impingement and how best to surgically treat it, it also provides an exceptionally visual tool for patient communication.”

Smith & Nephew launched the Dyonics Plan Hip Impingement Planning System at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting in New Orleans. The 3-D software system allows surgeons to visualize, assess and generate a comprehensive surgical report for each patient’s femoroacetabular impingement surgery before the patient enters the operating room.

According to a company press release, Dyonics Plan provides a standardized and repeatable way for the assessment of hip impingement treatment options based on data from low-dose CT scans. The software, which is installed on a surgeon’s computer, also allows for interactive adjustments based on a surgeon’s clinical experience. A surgeon can perform a variety of dynamic range-of-motion simulations to identify the degree and location of hip impingement by using the 3-D model of the patient’s joint. The range of motion feature can be used to individualize a surgical plan based on a patient’s lifestyle or sports-specific motion, or to assess impact of different surgical strategies on patient outcomes. Once finalized, the system generates a comprehensive surgical plan that can be exported into either HTML or PDF format.

“Dyonics Plan offers surgeons the ability to understand and address a patient’s hip impingement on a level that goes beyond anything possible with standard imaging tools,” Brad Cannon, president of endoscopy, trauma and extremities for Smith & Nephew, stated in the release. “Because it tells a more complete story about each patient’s impingement and how best to surgically treat it, it also provides an exceptionally visual tool for patient communication.”