In the JournalsPerspective

Similar return-to-play rates seen in amateur, recreational athletes after hip arthroscopy for FAI

Although recreational athletes were significantly older than high-level athletes, both groups had high return-to-play rates and similar patient-reported outcomes after hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement.

Researchers collected data for 66 consecutive athletes who underwent hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement. Investigators categorized 17 athletes into a high-level amateur group and 49 athletes in a recreational group. They further categorized the athletes into six different sporting groups determined on physical demands on the hip. The modified Harris Hip score (mHHS), Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living subscale (HOS-ADL) and HOS-Sport specific subscale (HOS-SS) were collected preoperatively and at minimum 2-year follow-up. Athletes also answered a questionnaire about return to play and activity level.

Alexander E. Weber

Investigators found significant improvements for all patient-reported outcomes at the 2-year follow-up and saw no differences between the groups. Overall rate of return was 88% in the high-level amateur group and 94% in the recreational group.

Investigators noted decreased HOS-SS and mHHS correlated with increased preoperative withdrawal time from sport before surgery. Athletes returned to sport significantly slower if they withdrew from a sport for more than 8 months prior to surgery. Less improvements in HOS and mHHS scores correlated with increasing BMI. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: Weber reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Although recreational athletes were significantly older than high-level athletes, both groups had high return-to-play rates and similar patient-reported outcomes after hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement.

Researchers collected data for 66 consecutive athletes who underwent hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement. Investigators categorized 17 athletes into a high-level amateur group and 49 athletes in a recreational group. They further categorized the athletes into six different sporting groups determined on physical demands on the hip. The modified Harris Hip score (mHHS), Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living subscale (HOS-ADL) and HOS-Sport specific subscale (HOS-SS) were collected preoperatively and at minimum 2-year follow-up. Athletes also answered a questionnaire about return to play and activity level.

Alexander E. Weber

Investigators found significant improvements for all patient-reported outcomes at the 2-year follow-up and saw no differences between the groups. Overall rate of return was 88% in the high-level amateur group and 94% in the recreational group.

Investigators noted decreased HOS-SS and mHHS correlated with increased preoperative withdrawal time from sport before surgery. Athletes returned to sport significantly slower if they withdrew from a sport for more than 8 months prior to surgery. Less improvements in HOS and mHHS scores correlated with increasing BMI. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: Weber reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

    Perspective
    Christopher M. Larson

    Christopher M. Larson

    This study evaluated 66 patients undergoing hip arthroscopy who participated in athletics at either the high school/collegiate level or recreationally. The study concludes that both groups improved significantly and to a similar level, 92% returned to sports, and a longer time away from sports prior to surgery correlated with poorer outcomes and recovery.

    Points of interest: The average time these athletes had been unable to perform their sport prior to surgery was 9.6 months and nearly 50% had a significant chondral delamination. It might be that we are not making the diagnosis in a timely manner in the non-professional athletic population. Secondly, in this non-elite group of athletes, the time to return to full sports was 9 months to10 months and significantly greater than reported for prior studies including elite level athletes. This is important information with regard to counseling patients, in particular for those who have had to cease sports secondary to pain prior to surgery.

    In addition, there were 40 female patients and only 26 male patients, and this might represent a slightly different population than the typical football or hockey cohorts. Further studies in these different athletic subpopulations with greater numbers and follow-up are required to better define these findings.

    • Christopher M. Larson, MD
    • Orthopedic Sports Medicine Surgeon Twin Cities Orthopedics Edina, Minn.

    Disclosures: Larson reports no relevant financial disclosures.