Meeting News Coverage

Patients have improved outcomes after combined osteotomy, meniscus transplantation, cartilage repair

HOLLYWOOD, Fla. — Patients have long-term improvements in patients who have combined osteotomy, meniscus transplantation and articular cartilage surgery, according to study presented at the Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting, here.

“Although there was a high rate of reoperation, the revision rate and the arthroplasty conversion rate was low,” Joshua David Harris, MD, said.

Harris and colleagues conducted a retrospective case series study of 18 patients who underwent simultaneous meniscal transplant, distal femoral or proximal tibial osteotomy and articular cartilage surgery between April 2001 and April 2012 by a single surgeon for post-meniscectomized compartment, full-thickness articular cartilage loss and greater than 3° of coronal plane malalignment. Follow-up was approximately 6.5 years. The mean patient age was 34 years and patients had been symptomatic for an average of 7.4 years with an average of 2.4 previous surgeries.

Researchers analyzed SF-12, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective form, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome (KOOS) Score subscores, and Lysholm knee scores at postoperative 6 months, 1 year, 2 years and final follow-up. Patients were permitted to return to impact activities 8 months after surgery and return to sport 12 months postoperatively.

They observed a more than 20-point improvement in IKDC scores and a more than 30-point improvement in Lysholm knee scores, both of which were statistically significant. All KOOS scores improved at final follow-up, he said. At the 2-year follow-up, patients had significant improvements in both Lysholm and KOOS quality of life scores.

Overall, 13 reoperations were required in 10 patients and one patient needed either a total knee replacement or revision cartilage surgery and meniscal transplant. Harris said the most common complication was arthrofibrosis, which occurred in 16.7% of the patients. – by Christian Ingram

Reference:

Harris JD. Paper #SS-75. Presented at: Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting; May 1-3, 2014; Hollywood, Fla.

Disclosure: Harris has no relevant financial disclosures.

HOLLYWOOD, Fla. — Patients have long-term improvements in patients who have combined osteotomy, meniscus transplantation and articular cartilage surgery, according to study presented at the Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting, here.

“Although there was a high rate of reoperation, the revision rate and the arthroplasty conversion rate was low,” Joshua David Harris, MD, said.

Harris and colleagues conducted a retrospective case series study of 18 patients who underwent simultaneous meniscal transplant, distal femoral or proximal tibial osteotomy and articular cartilage surgery between April 2001 and April 2012 by a single surgeon for post-meniscectomized compartment, full-thickness articular cartilage loss and greater than 3° of coronal plane malalignment. Follow-up was approximately 6.5 years. The mean patient age was 34 years and patients had been symptomatic for an average of 7.4 years with an average of 2.4 previous surgeries.

Researchers analyzed SF-12, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective form, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome (KOOS) Score subscores, and Lysholm knee scores at postoperative 6 months, 1 year, 2 years and final follow-up. Patients were permitted to return to impact activities 8 months after surgery and return to sport 12 months postoperatively.

They observed a more than 20-point improvement in IKDC scores and a more than 30-point improvement in Lysholm knee scores, both of which were statistically significant. All KOOS scores improved at final follow-up, he said. At the 2-year follow-up, patients had significant improvements in both Lysholm and KOOS quality of life scores.

Overall, 13 reoperations were required in 10 patients and one patient needed either a total knee replacement or revision cartilage surgery and meniscal transplant. Harris said the most common complication was arthrofibrosis, which occurred in 16.7% of the patients. – by Christian Ingram

Reference:

Harris JD. Paper #SS-75. Presented at: Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting; May 1-3, 2014; Hollywood, Fla.

Disclosure: Harris has no relevant financial disclosures.