In the Journals

Socioeconomic status influences patient knowledge of medical condition of advanced OA

Among patients with advanced osteoarthritis, socioeconomic status influenced patient knowledge of their medical condition, decision status and treatment decision, with use of shared decision-making tools benefiting patients of all types of backgrounds, according to study results.

Researchers randomly assigned 123 patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis to a shared decision-making (SDM) intervention group or a control group. Patients in the intervention group received a booklet and DVD decision aids that provided evidence-based, unbiased information on both surgical and non-surgical treatment options and supported a more informed dialog between individuals and physicians. These patients were asked to write down a list of questions they may want to ask the doctor during consultation.

Patients in the control group received a standardized two-page brochure about osteoarthritis sent to all patients. Both groups completed a baseline survey that included questions on knowledge related to osteoarthritis, education level and income level.

Compared with patients with Medicare, results showed patients with private insurance were 2.7-times more likely to arrive at a treatment decision during the initial visit. The researchers also found a stronger association when accounting for age, gender and ethnicity.

Patients with a higher education level had lower odds of choosing surgery vs. non-operative treatment, and use of SDM tools had no significant effect on the likelihood of choosing surgical vs. non-surgical treatment, according to the researchers. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: Youm reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Among patients with advanced osteoarthritis, socioeconomic status influenced patient knowledge of their medical condition, decision status and treatment decision, with use of shared decision-making tools benefiting patients of all types of backgrounds, according to study results.

Researchers randomly assigned 123 patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis to a shared decision-making (SDM) intervention group or a control group. Patients in the intervention group received a booklet and DVD decision aids that provided evidence-based, unbiased information on both surgical and non-surgical treatment options and supported a more informed dialog between individuals and physicians. These patients were asked to write down a list of questions they may want to ask the doctor during consultation.

Patients in the control group received a standardized two-page brochure about osteoarthritis sent to all patients. Both groups completed a baseline survey that included questions on knowledge related to osteoarthritis, education level and income level.

Compared with patients with Medicare, results showed patients with private insurance were 2.7-times more likely to arrive at a treatment decision during the initial visit. The researchers also found a stronger association when accounting for age, gender and ethnicity.

Patients with a higher education level had lower odds of choosing surgery vs. non-operative treatment, and use of SDM tools had no significant effect on the likelihood of choosing surgical vs. non-surgical treatment, according to the researchers. – by Casey Tingle

Disclosures: Youm reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.