ACR approves standardized measures to determine RA disease activity

A working group organized by the American College of Rheumatology has analyzed more than 60 disease activity measures for rheumatoid arthritis and recommended six measures that can be applied in clinical practice, according to a press release.

The analysis by the Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Clinical Disease Activity Measures Working Group apppear in Arthritis Care & Research.

“Our goal was to determine which RA disease activity measures could accurately distinguish the various levels of RA activity and would also be reasonable to implement in clinical practice,” Salahuddin Kazi, MD, from the Dallas Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Texas and a lead study investigator, stated in a press release.

The work group performed a literature review and identified 63 disease activity measures for RA and then selected 14 measures to be evaluated by practicing rheumatologists. Based on their feedback, nine measures were determined to be feasible and useful in a clinical setting. Finally, the group chose the following six measures based on responsiveness, reliability and validity:

  • Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI);
  • Disease Activity Score with 28-joint counts (DAS-28);
  • Patient Activity Scale (PAS);
  • PAS-II;
  • Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data with three measures (RAPID 3); and
  • Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI).


“The measures recommended to determine RA disease activity are sensitive to change, can discriminate between low, moderate and high disease activity states, include remission criteria and are feasible to perform in a clinical setting,” Kazi stated in the release. “Incorporating standardized disease activity measures will facilitate adherence to the ACR guidelines for treating RA and aid clinicians in providing quality care to their patients with RA.”

Reference:

    • Anderson J, Caplan L, Yazdany, et al. Rheumatoid arthritis disease activity measures: American College of Rheumatology recommendations for use in clinical practice. Arthrit Care Res. 2012. Published online before print April 2, 2012. doi:10.1002/acr.21649.


A working group organized by the American College of Rheumatology has analyzed more than 60 disease activity measures for rheumatoid arthritis and recommended six measures that can be applied in clinical practice, according to a press release.

The analysis by the Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Clinical Disease Activity Measures Working Group apppear in Arthritis Care & Research.

“Our goal was to determine which RA disease activity measures could accurately distinguish the various levels of RA activity and would also be reasonable to implement in clinical practice,” Salahuddin Kazi, MD, from the Dallas Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Texas and a lead study investigator, stated in a press release.

The work group performed a literature review and identified 63 disease activity measures for RA and then selected 14 measures to be evaluated by practicing rheumatologists. Based on their feedback, nine measures were determined to be feasible and useful in a clinical setting. Finally, the group chose the following six measures based on responsiveness, reliability and validity:

  • Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI);
  • Disease Activity Score with 28-joint counts (DAS-28);
  • Patient Activity Scale (PAS);
  • PAS-II;
  • Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data with three measures (RAPID 3); and
  • Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI).


“The measures recommended to determine RA disease activity are sensitive to change, can discriminate between low, moderate and high disease activity states, include remission criteria and are feasible to perform in a clinical setting,” Kazi stated in the release. “Incorporating standardized disease activity measures will facilitate adherence to the ACR guidelines for treating RA and aid clinicians in providing quality care to their patients with RA.”

Reference:

    • Anderson J, Caplan L, Yazdany, et al. Rheumatoid arthritis disease activity measures: American College of Rheumatology recommendations for use in clinical practice. Arthrit Care Res. 2012. Published online before print April 2, 2012. doi:10.1002/acr.21649.