Meeting News Coverage

D-Eye increases distribution of portable retinal screening system

NEW YORK – D-Eye announced here at Vision Expo East the increased distribution of its device that attaches to a smartphone to record high-resolution images and video of the posterior segment.

“We are pushing it out to the medical community by way of universities,” D-Eye Chief Executive Officer Richard Sill told Primary Care Optometry News.

D-Eye fits onto a bumper that is affixed to a smartphone. Through the imaging system, an undilated eye provides a 6-degree field of view, while a dilated eye provides nearly a 20-degree field of view.

“D-Eye cannot compete with a conventional fundus camera,” Sill said. “However, it may have a niche when and where conventional fundus photography is not an option.”

The company plans on introducing a device for the iPhone 6 plus in about a month, he said.

A number of researchers are conducting studies with the technology, including the University of Liverpool, University of Pennsylvania, Harvard and Brown University, Sill said.

The product is FDA registered, he said, explaining that products such as this are 501(k) exempt.

“We just need proper labeling and manufacturing,” Sill said. “The FDA has already inspected us.”

Currently, 1,200 of the D-Eye devices are in use by ophthalmologists and optometrists, he said, in the areas of pediatrics, neurology, emergency medicine and hospitals. – by Nancy Hemphill, ELS, FAAO

Disclosure: Sill is employed by D-Eye.

NEW YORK – D-Eye announced here at Vision Expo East the increased distribution of its device that attaches to a smartphone to record high-resolution images and video of the posterior segment.

“We are pushing it out to the medical community by way of universities,” D-Eye Chief Executive Officer Richard Sill told Primary Care Optometry News.

D-Eye fits onto a bumper that is affixed to a smartphone. Through the imaging system, an undilated eye provides a 6-degree field of view, while a dilated eye provides nearly a 20-degree field of view.

“D-Eye cannot compete with a conventional fundus camera,” Sill said. “However, it may have a niche when and where conventional fundus photography is not an option.”

The company plans on introducing a device for the iPhone 6 plus in about a month, he said.

A number of researchers are conducting studies with the technology, including the University of Liverpool, University of Pennsylvania, Harvard and Brown University, Sill said.

The product is FDA registered, he said, explaining that products such as this are 501(k) exempt.

“We just need proper labeling and manufacturing,” Sill said. “The FDA has already inspected us.”

Currently, 1,200 of the D-Eye devices are in use by ophthalmologists and optometrists, he said, in the areas of pediatrics, neurology, emergency medicine and hospitals. – by Nancy Hemphill, ELS, FAAO

Disclosure: Sill is employed by D-Eye.

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