Meeting News Coverage

‘Next generation’ genetic test for AMD now available

ATLANTA — Arctic announced here at SECO that the latest generation of its in-office test for age-related macular degeneration now incorporates additional genetic markers as well as nongenetic risk factors.

The Macula Risk NXG, a genetic test designed to predict progression of age-related macular degeneration through the use of a cheek swab, offers genetic markers from the original Macula Risk test but now also incorporates seven additional markers that have recently been discovered, according to company literature. Nongenetic risk factors, such as age, smoking history, body mass index and clinical AMD status, are also included.

“The new test gives us the ability to provide 2-, 5- and 10-year risk of progression in addition to lifetime risk,” private practitioner David W. Nelson, OD, MBA, told Primary Care Optometry News. “We’re giving patients a much more urgent message: stop smoking, lose weight, eat right, use supplements.”

AMD is 60% genetics and 40% environmental, Kathy Rymer, Arctic director of sales, told PCON.

“You can show patients a graph of their risk level to assist in counseling,” she said.

Current customers are being transitioned into the new test, Nelson said.

Disclosure: Nelson is vice president for optometry professional relations for Arctic.

ATLANTA — Arctic announced here at SECO that the latest generation of its in-office test for age-related macular degeneration now incorporates additional genetic markers as well as nongenetic risk factors.

The Macula Risk NXG, a genetic test designed to predict progression of age-related macular degeneration through the use of a cheek swab, offers genetic markers from the original Macula Risk test but now also incorporates seven additional markers that have recently been discovered, according to company literature. Nongenetic risk factors, such as age, smoking history, body mass index and clinical AMD status, are also included.

“The new test gives us the ability to provide 2-, 5- and 10-year risk of progression in addition to lifetime risk,” private practitioner David W. Nelson, OD, MBA, told Primary Care Optometry News. “We’re giving patients a much more urgent message: stop smoking, lose weight, eat right, use supplements.”

AMD is 60% genetics and 40% environmental, Kathy Rymer, Arctic director of sales, told PCON.

“You can show patients a graph of their risk level to assist in counseling,” she said.

Current customers are being transitioned into the new test, Nelson said.

Disclosure: Nelson is vice president for optometry professional relations for Arctic.

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