In the Journals

Study finds greater risk of heart disease in men with central serous chorioretinopathy

In a population-based retrospective cohort and case control study, Chen and colleagues found that men with central serous chorioretinopathy had a significantly higher coronary heart disease rate than those without central serous chorioretinopathy.

The abstract, published in British Journal of Ophthalmology, explained that longitudinal data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database were analyzed. The study comprised 835 patients with a diagnosis of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) and 4,175 age and gender matched patients without the condition.

Kaplan-Meier plots and log-rank tests were used to compare differences in the hazard rates of coronary heart disease (CHD) between the CSCR and non-CSCR cohorts. Stratified Cox proportional hazard models were applied to examine the association between CSCR and CHD.

Researchers found that the 5-year CHD cumulative incidence for patients with CSCR was nearly twofold that of the non-CSCR cohort from the log-rank test, the abstract stated. Additionally, the adjusted CHD HR of CSCR vs. non-CSCR was 1.61 from the Cox model. As for gender, the risk was 1.72 for males and 1.34 for females.

Chen and colleagues concluded that CSCR may be a potential risk factor for the development of CHD for men, as males with CSCR were found to have a significantly higher CHD rate than those without CSCR.

In a population-based retrospective cohort and case control study, Chen and colleagues found that men with central serous chorioretinopathy had a significantly higher coronary heart disease rate than those without central serous chorioretinopathy.

The abstract, published in British Journal of Ophthalmology, explained that longitudinal data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database were analyzed. The study comprised 835 patients with a diagnosis of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) and 4,175 age and gender matched patients without the condition.

Kaplan-Meier plots and log-rank tests were used to compare differences in the hazard rates of coronary heart disease (CHD) between the CSCR and non-CSCR cohorts. Stratified Cox proportional hazard models were applied to examine the association between CSCR and CHD.

Researchers found that the 5-year CHD cumulative incidence for patients with CSCR was nearly twofold that of the non-CSCR cohort from the log-rank test, the abstract stated. Additionally, the adjusted CHD HR of CSCR vs. non-CSCR was 1.61 from the Cox model. As for gender, the risk was 1.72 for males and 1.34 for females.

Chen and colleagues concluded that CSCR may be a potential risk factor for the development of CHD for men, as males with CSCR were found to have a significantly higher CHD rate than those without CSCR.